dipeptide

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di·pep·tide

(dī-pep'tīd),
A combination of two amino acids by means of a peptide (-CO-NH-) link.

dipeptide

(dī-pĕp′tīd′)
n.
A peptide that is composed of two amino acid molecules linked by a peptide bond.

dipeptide

an organic compound formed by the union of two amino acids, with the link provided by the carboxyl group of one molecule and the amine group of the other.

di·pep·tide

(dī-pep'tīd)
A combination of two amino acids by means of a peptide (-CO-NH-) link.
Dipeptideclick for a larger image
Fig. 132 Dipeptide . Formation and molecular structure.

dipeptide

the product of joining together two AMINO ACIDS by a CONDENSATION REACTION forming a PEPTIDE BOND.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's no wonder carnosine is referred to as the "antiaging dipeptide.
Correlation between the stability of a protein and its dipeptide composition: a novel approach for predicting in vivo stability from its primary structure.
The second aim was to investigate whether the DPP IV-mediated loss of the amino-terminal dipeptide changes the susceptibility of human BNP to cleavage by human NEP.
The dipeptide, RG had effects similar to those of the tripeptide RGD.
ANSWER: The enzymes of the stomach and small intestine which digest large protein molecules into smaller parts, like dipeptides and amino acids, do not differentiate among protein from meat, fish, and poultry, protein from dairy products and eggs, and protein from plant sources.
Also noteworthy are reactions in which medium-sized ring dipeptides gave bicyclic products by azeotropic distillation of water (Shemyakin et al.
The Power Of Whole-Cell Reaction: Efficient Production Of Hydropyroline, Sugar Nucleotides, Oligosaccharides, And Dipeptides
The toxic effects of Gln can be avoided by adding dipeptides into the culture media for direct use by mammalian cells in vitro (Eagle, 1955).
Neuland researchers have also developed special methods to economically produce large quantities of high value peptide building blocks such as pseudoproline dipeptides.
Using this information, his team successfully modified arginine-containing dipeptides in order to limit their enzymatic hydrolysis in the upper layers of the epidermis.