Dionysian


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Related to Dionysian: Apollonian and Dionysian

Dionysian

[dē·onis′ē·ən]
Etymology: Gk, Dionysos, Greek god of wine
the personal attitude of one who is uninhibited, mystic, sensual, emotional, and irrational and who may seek to escape from the boundaries imposed by the limits of the senses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, this repellant Dionysian image foreshadows Aschenbach's final transformation into the ludicrous made-up figure that is desperate to impress his "lover" with the "aura of youth" (Mann 203, 210-11, 214, 261).
Dionysian experience of the destruction and dissolution of the psycho-mental, individualized ego-self in mystical Oneness is a hard wisdom, however.
In The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche defines Apollo and Dionysus as "the starting-point for our recognition that there exists in the world of the Greeks an enormous opposition" between the Apollonian sculpting or form-giving drive and the Dionysian imageless and musical drive that exist "side by side, mostly in open conflict, stimulating and provoking [reizen)] one another [.
Here Daniels remains too close to Nietzsche's own language of the mediation of Dionysian power by Apollonian form, instead of engaging also with more general philosophical and psychological literatures--for example, works by Dewey, Beardsley, and Adorno, among others--that might clarify this phenomenon by drawing on further vocabularies.
Arnold clearly presents the story of Marsyas as a contest between Dionysian and Apollonian art.
The dynamics of tragedy correspond with the drives registered in the human body, hence the precedence of tragedy in the sadomasochistic practices of the Dionysian Barbarians, who expressed the artistic drives of nature through their "repulsive mixture of sexuality and cruelty" (Tragedy 20).
While individuals like Ezra Pound and Eliot owed much to the Symbolists in formulating the need for a poetry that effectively dealt with modern circumstances and that remained grounded in contemporary subjects, they tempered the Dionysian perverseness of French Symbolist poetry with an Apollonian appreciation of culture and intellect.
The first panel is Nietzsche's more familiar account of the Apollonian and Dionysian forces as they manifest themselves in ancient Greece before being repressed by the third, Socratic, force (BT [section][section]1-13).
The characters portray a time not unlike today, in which Dionysian appetites vie with religious zealotry for public sentiment.
Free beer perhaps, or better yet, weekends filled with Dionysian debauchery.
Everyone at The Box should feel like it's a constant bath of Dionysian debauchery," Hammerstein said.