Dionysian

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Dionysian

[dē·onis′ē·ən]
Etymology: Gk, Dionysos, Greek god of wine
the personal attitude of one who is uninhibited, mystic, sensual, emotional, and irrational and who may seek to escape from the boundaries imposed by the limits of the senses.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Dionysiac dithyramb man is stimulated to the highest intensification of his symbolic powers; something that he has never felt before urgently demands to be expressed: the destruction of the veil of maya, one-ness as the genius of humankind, indeed of nature itself.
Dionysiac enthusiasm, as we shall see in a later chapter, produced a series of nude figures that had a longer and more continuous life than the embodiments of Olympian calm.
Pentheus insists on boundaries between himself and the Dionysiac, between the identities of male and female, love and hate.
The "uneasiness" with which those "Apollonian forms" contain Dionysiac force expresses a larger process of fragmentation that allows the historical present to secrete its own anxieties within the fissures of the text, and this is the source of the "impurity" that Grady seeks to develop into a fully fledged critical practice.
Giorgio's spirit "viveva nell'orrore di un mondo sconosciuto, al cospetto di un popolo senza nome, partecipando a un rito d'origine oscurissima" (282), like a dionysiac mystery (282); "senza nome," as if from an undifferentiated racial id.
The ithyphallic is the phallus in erection, as it was represented in Dionysiac or Bacchic feasts.
If our analysis has shown that the Apolline in tragedy bas by means of its deception carried off a complete victory over the Dionysiac essence of music, using it for its own purposes--namely a supreme clarification of drama--we might certainly add one very important reservation: at its most significant point that Apolline deception has been broken and destroyed.
Jones, "The Victorian and Dionysiac Paschal Tables in the West," Speculum 9 (1934): 408-21, gives the background for the various methods of Easter reckoning in England and Ireland, and their contributions both to the Easter Controversy and Bede's own computistical work.
He was supported by his lover, a Dionysiac priestess but eventually, he had to face his nemesis, the cruel, bloodthirsty general Crassus.
It is the Dionysiac sparagmos, which, as a political program, inevitably becomes a holocaust.
Its even longer "Variante" then humorously reasserts and expands upon both such a libidinous virile behavior and the apology of nakedness with the description of a Dionysiac, orgiastic scene set in the "postribolo piu frequentato," eventually culminating in a provocative, absurdiste manifesto "against clothing":
Limassol's carnival celebrations date back hundreds of years with their origins in Greek mythology and the Dionysiac festivals.