dioecious

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Related to Dioecy: dioecious

dioecious

also

diecious

(dī-ē′shəs)
adj.
Biology Having the male and female reproductive organs, especially flowers, on different individuals.

di·oe′cism (-sĭz′əm) n.
di′oe′cy (-sē) n.

dioecious

See diecious.

dioecious

adjective Referring to the biological property in which a particular group of organisms has two distinct—male and female—sexual states.

dioecious

(of plants) having male flowers carried by one individual and female flowers carried by another individual. The willow is an example of a dioecious plant. The term literally means ‘having two homes’. Compare MONOECIOUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sexual specialization and inbreeding avoidance in the evolution of dioecy.
Dioecy is a trait that is of considerable interest in mapping, and molecular markers have been linked to dioecy in a number of angiosperms (Ainsworth, 2000; Charlesworth, 2002; Vyskot and Hobza, 2004).
As a group, molluscs exhibit highly diverse modes of sexual reproduction, ranging from functional hermaphroditism, alternative sexuality, to strict dioecy and genetic determination (Coe 1943; Guo and Allen 1994a).
In Angiosperms the return to unisporangiate flowers together with monoeicy and dioecy, is most obviously associated with wind pollination.
Dioecy in Bromeliaceae has been reported for all three: Tillandsioideae (some populations of taxa in the genus Catopsis Griseb.
The relationship between crop size and fruit removal and its implication for the evolution of dioecy.
One reproductive pathway that seems to have occurred repeatedly within the angiosperms is the evolutionary breakdown of hermaphroditism (cosexuality) towards gender dimorphisms such as dioecy and gynodioecy (de Arroyo and Raven 1975, Webb 1979, Sakai et al.
Evolution of dioecy in flowering plants* Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 11: 15-39.
Ecology of plant dioecy in the intcnnountain region of western North America.
The consequences of limited mate availability for the evolution of SI systems were discussed by Charlesworth (1988) and Lloyd and Webb (1992), and limited mate availability has been invoked in comparisons of reproductive efficiency in dioecy versus gametophytic SI (Anderson and Stebbins 1984, 1994; Karoly 1994).
The incidence of dioecy varies considerably in different regional floras (summarized in Steiner 1988), including values as low as 2.