nitrous oxide

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Related to Dinitrogen monoxide: laughing gas

nitrous

 [ni´trus]
pertaining to or containing nitrogen in its lowest valence.
nitrous oxide a colorless, odorless gas that is a weak inhalational anesthetic, usually used in combination with a potent halogenated inhalational anesthetic to produce general anesthesia or briefly for dental surgery. Its use as a sole agent requires high concentrations that may cause hypoxia. abuse poses the risk of anoxic death from asphyxia. Popularly known as laughing gas.

ni·trous ox·ide

(nī'trŭs oks'īd),
N2O; a nonflammable, nonexplosive gas that will support combustion; widely used as a rapidly acting, rapidly reversible, nondepressant, and nontoxic inhalation analgesic to supplement other anesthetics and analgesics; its anesthetic potency alone at normal atmospheric pressure is inadequate to provide surgical anesthesia.

nitrous oxide

n.
A colorless, sweet-tasting gas, N2O, used as a mild anesthetic in dentistry and surgery.

nitrous oxide (N2O, NOx)

[nī′trəs]
a colorless, odorless gas, first used as an anesthetic agent in 1844, is the least potent of currently used inhalation anesthetics. It provides analgesia but not complete amnesia or akinesia and is usually supplemented with other drugs. Because high concentrations of nitrous oxide are required, hypoxia is a risk and supplemental oxygen is needed. Nitrous oxide is associated with an increased incidence of nausea and vomiting, environmental pollution, spontaneous abortion in healthcare workers exposed, and suspected teratogenicity. It has many contraindications to its use. Despite these shortcomings it remains in use in the United States because of its rapid onset and offset, relative lack of cardiac or respiratory depression, and its low cost. It is most often used to supplement other anesthetic agents, especially during an inhalation induction of children. Nitrous oxide remains a commonly administered dental anesthetic.
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Nitrous oxide administration

nitrous oxide

NO2 Anesthesiology The most commonly used inhalation anesthetic Pharmacologic effects Analgesia, delirium, loss of motor control, elation, excitement Used for Pre-operative, short minor surgery

ni·trous ox·ide

(nī'trŭs ok'sīd)
A nonflammable, nonexplosive gas that will support combustion; widely used as a rapidly acting, rapidly reversible, nondepressant, and nontoxic inhalation analgesic to supplement other anesthetics and analgesics; its anesthetic potency is inadequate to provide surgical anesthesia.
Synonym(s): laughing gas.

nitrous oxide

A weak anaesthetic and painkilling (analgesic) gas widely used as a vehicle for more potent anaesthetic agents in the maintenance of general anaesthesia. Also known as ‘laughing gas’. The drug is on the WHO official list.

Nitrous oxide

A colorless, sweet-smelling gas used by dentists for mild anesthesia. It is sometimes called laughing gas because it makes some patients feel giddy or silly.
Mentioned in: Tooth Extraction

nitrous oxide

; NO2 liquid NO2, at -88.5°C, can be used as a cryotherapeutic agent

ni·trous ox·ide

(nī'trŭs ok'sīd)
Nonflammable, nonexplosive gas that will support combustion; widely used as a quick acting, reversible, nondepressant, and nontoxic inhalation analgesic to supplement other anesthetics and analgesics.

nitrous oxide (NO) (nī´trəs ok´sīd),

n (laughing gas, nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen monoxidum), a gas with a sweet odor and taste used with oxygen as an analgesic and sedative agent for the performance of minor operations. It is sometimes called
laughing gas because it may excite a hilarious delirium preceding insensibility.

nitrous

pertaining to or containing nitrogen in its lowest valence.

nitrous oxide
a gas used by inhalation as a general anesthetic; called also laughing gas.