diglyceride

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Related to Diglycerides: Monoglycerides

diglyceride

 [di-glis´er-īd]
a glyceride containing two fatty acid molecules in ester linkage.

diglyceride

/di·glyc·er·ide/ (di-glis´er-īd) diacylglycerol.

diglyceride

(dī-glĭs′ə-rīd′)
n.
An ester of two fatty acids and glycerol.

diglyceride

[dīglis′ərīd]
a chemical compound, a diester ester of glycerol in which the hydrogen in two of the hydroxyl groups is replaced by an acyl radical.

diglyceride

a glyceride containing two fatty acid molecules in ester linkage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dough conditioners: Azodicarbonamide, calcium peroxide, L-cysteine, mono-and diglycerides, potassium bromate, sodium metabisulfite
The transesterifaction of triglyceride leads to mono- and diglycerides of lower molecular weight compared to triglycerides, and the resulting molecular weight is known to be inversely proportional to the glycerol content.
During frying, fats and oils undergo oxidation and/or hydrolysis to produce polar products, such as epoxides, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, acids, mono- and diglycerides.
An antimicrobial dressing was applied to the SDG with a silver-coated polyamide mesh impregnated with an ointment composed by fatty acids of diglycerides and triglycerides.
Surface chemical promotion of Ca oxide catalysts in biodiesel production reaction by the addition of monoglycerides, diglycerides and glycerol.
The reactions of triglycerides (TG), diglycerides (DG) and monoglycerides (MG) with methanol to produce methyl ester (ME) in the forward reactions appeared to be second order up to 60 min of reaction time.
Digestive lipids such as triglycerides, diglycerides, fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol [1], and other lipids based on synthetic origin offer improvement in bioavailability of the drug in contrast to the nondigestible lipids with which reduced bioavailability may occur due to impairment in absorption caused by retention of the fraction of administered drug in the formulation itself.
A commercial blend of 80% saturated mono- and diglycerides and 20% polysorbate 80 was used as the emulsifier.
Some respondents were more explicit, naming items such as mono and diglycerides.
Diglycerides in hemolymph are an important energy reserve for insects, comprising about 3% of the total lipid content (Bailey 1975; Beenakkers et al.