Digenea


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Di·ge·ne·a

(dī-jē'nē-ă),
Subclass of parasitic flatworms (class Trematoda) characterized by a complex life cycle involving developmental multiplying stages in a mollusk intermediate host, an adult stage in a vertebrate, and often involving an additional transport host or an additional intermediate host; includes all the common flukes of humans and other mammals.
[G. di-, two, + genesis, generation]

Digenea

a subclass or order of trematodes containing the liver FLUKES. Compare MONO GENEA.

Digenea

a subclass of trematodes that includes most of the flukes of veterinary importance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The parasites of Lophius piscatorius from various localities PARASITE LOCALITY AUTHOR DIGENEA Aphallus tubarium France (39) Greece (19) Prosorhynchoides borealis Northeast Atlantic (27) P.
Digenea Hospedero Prevalencia (*) Cladorchiidae Nematophila grandis P.
Monogenea None Digenea None Oodinium pilluris (egg) Protozoa Chilodonella sp.
Key words: Rhopalias (Rhopaliasidae), new species, Amphimerus (Opistorehiidae), Trematoda, Digenea, Marsupials parasites, Cauca Valley, Colombia.
A seasonal and historical study of larval Digenea infecting Cerithidea californica (Gastropoda: Prosobranchia) from Goleta Sough, Santa Barbara County, California.
Adaptive plasticity, Cercomeria, Digenea, Eucestoda, evolutionary loss, macroevolution, Monogenea, morphological diversification, parasitic platyhelminths, phylogenetic system-
Analyses of DNA sequences in the protein's codifying and non-codifying regions, have been largely used in phylogenetic studies on fish helminths parasites (Clark, 2006), with special reference to investigations on the three main Platyhelminthes groups: Cestoda, Digenea and Monogenea.
Skrjabin (1924) established the family Eucotylidae to Digenea to accommodate the genera Eucotyle Cohn (1904), Tamerlania Skrjabin (1924) and Tanaisia Skrjabin (1924), but latter Nezlobinski (1926) included two other genera; Ohridia and Lepidopteria followed by the addition of the new genus Prohystra suggested by Korkhaus in 1930.
Members of the genus Procerovum (class Trematoda, subclass Digenea, family Heterophyidae, subfamily Haplorchiinae) parasitize predominantly fish-eating birds, which are the definitive hosts.
Benthic habit also facilitates the increase of wealth and abundance of parasitic larvae since the fishes tend to stay close to the bottom, in touch with clams or other invertebrates that will act as the first intermediate hosts for Digenea (GEORGE-NASCIMENTO, 1987; MARCOGLIESE, 2002).
Digenea and acanthocephalans were found in massive numbers, obliterating the intestinal lumen, which suggests that the bird died as a result of the parasitic intestinal obstruction.