diffraction

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diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

/dif·frac·tion/ (dĭ-frak´shun) the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

diffraction

[difrak′shən]
Etymology: L, dis, opposite of, frangere, to break
the bending and scattering of wavelengths of light or other radiation as the radiation passes around obstacles or through narrow slits. X-ray diffraction is used in the study of the internal structure of cells. See also refraction.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

deflection of light rays by their passage from one medium into another, e.g. from air into water

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.

diffraction

the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

x-ray diffraction
a method used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the single object, e.g. protein molecule, that composes the crystal. Based on recording and analyzing the diffraction pattern of an x-ray beam passing through a crystalline structure, either organic or inorganic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microscopy techniques have been developed that exploit all of these caveats to break the diffraction limit.
Beating the diffraction limit, the new prototype instrument can resolve depth to one-sixth of what the best conventional optical microscopes can achieve.
This lets the lens overcomes the diffraction limit.
Many nanoscale applications in the semiconductor, medical and precision machining fields today have surface features and defects with dimensions that limit detection or identification due to the optical diffraction limit.
The 6000ILM AFM lets life science researchers go beyond the optical diffraction limit to achieve nanoscale spatial resolution with unprecedented ease of use.
Our BioScope II will bring to the Institute the capability to image biological complexes far beyond the diffraction limit of light, as well as measure nanomechanical properties of single biomolecules, cells and tissues.
With the X8 PROSPECTOR, crystallographers can rapidly determine the diffraction limit, mosaicity and space group of even extremely small protein crystals, typically in less than 5 minutes per sample.
The 11 papers here consider such topics as photonic properties of non-crystalline solids, ultrasonic wave transport in strongly scattering media, Anderson localization of ultrasound in three dimensions, time reversal focusing and the diffraction limit, and strongly correlated ultracold bosonic and fermionic quantum gases in optical lattices.
This novel optical surface profiler mode combines patent-pending hardware and software to enable select models of Bruker's ContourGT[R] 3D Optical Microscopes to break the optical diffraction limit and deliver lateral resolutions that were previously considered impossible to achieve.
Breakthrough innovations in the design of the FastScan Bio system have resulted in a fast scanning AFM that allows temporal investigation under physiological operating environments in fluid while exceeding the diffraction limits of optical microscopy.
In the first example, diffraction limits the ability of a lens or other focusing optic to focus light.