Dientamoeba

Dientamoeba

 [di″ent-tah-me´bah]
a genus of small highly active, usually nonpathogenic or mildly pathogenic ameboid protozoa parasitic in the large intestine of humans and certain monkeys. D. fragilis has been associated with human infection, which is manifested chiefly by diarrhea; abdominal pain; bloody, mucoid, or loose stools; and flatulence.

Dientamoeba

/Di·ent·amoe·ba/ (di-ent″ah-me´bah) a genus of amebas commonly found in the human colon and appendix, including D. fra´gilis, a species that has been associated with diarrhea.

Dientamoeba

(dī″ĕn-tă-mē′bă)
A genus of parasitic protozoa marked by possession of two similar nuclei.

Dientamoeba fragilis

A species of parasitic ameba inhabiting the intestine of humans. Persons infected may have diarrhea with blood or mucus, abdominal pain, and anal pruritus. This ameba has been found inside the eggs of pinworms. The eggs may act as a vector.

Dientamoeba

a genus of amebas commonly found in the colon and appendix of primates and of humans.

Dientamoeba fragilis
occurs in the cecum of humans and monkeys. A species that has been associated with diarrhea but its pathogenicity is unclear.
References in periodicals archive ?
An example of this would be in the case of Amoeba histolytica and Dientamoeba coll.
In the United States, or anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere for that matter, two parasites commonly cause diarrheal illness: Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum, and two uncommonly: Entamoeba histolytica and Dientamoeba fragilis.
Percentage rate of Nonpathogenic Entamoeba Dientamoeba Area infection protozoa* histolytica fragilis Rural 25.
The flagellated protozoan Dientamoeba fragilis is one of the most common parasites in the intestinal tract of humans (1).
Emerging from obscurity: biological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis.
A review of Dientamoeba fragilis carriage in humans: several reasons why this organism should be considered in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal illness.
Dientamoeba fragilis: initial evidence of pathogenicity in the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).
The ambiguous life of Dientamoeba fragilis: the need to investigate current hypotheses on transmission.
Internal transcribed spacer dimorphism and diversity in Dientamoeba fragilis.
Gorillas are a host for Dientamoeba fragilis: an update on the life cycle and host distribution.
intestinalis is rarely seen in urine sediment and is generally not clinically significant because, of the six genera of flagellates that parasitize the human intestinal or urogenital tracts, only Giardia lamblia, Dientamoeba fragilis and Trichomonas vaginalis are considered pathogens.
The possibly nonpathogenic parasite Dientamoeba fragilis and the nonpathogenic parasite Blastocystis hominis were common and were found more frequently in controls than in patients.