Dieffenbachia


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Related to Dieffenbachia: House plants

Dieffenbachia

a genus of the plant family Araceae; contains insoluble raphide oxalate crystals, and possibly other toxins, which cause severe irritation of the oral mucosa, especially swelling of the tongue. Includes D. maculata, D. picta, D. seguinae. Called also dumbcane.
References in periodicals archive ?
dieffenbachia, Philodendron, syngonium) and it is likely that Psydrothrips shares the same origin.
Dieffenbachia, grown as a common indoor plant has toxic ingredients that can cause mild symptoms of poisoning when ingested.
Acute airway compromise after brief exposure to Dieffenbachia plant.
I, too, have been impressed with the level of neglect mine can handle, and I would add another plant to your "can't-kill-it" list: Dieffenbachia.
EFFECTS OF POWDERED ROOTING HORMONE ON THE GROWTH OF DIEFFENBACHIA.
Outside, heavy snow swirled in gusty eddies below a blackened sky, but inside there thrived a tropical ecosystem where ficus trees and dieffenbachia flourished.
The Oregon Poison Control Center in Portland lists the following plants as poisonous: amaryllis, azalea, sand begonia, bird of paradise, Calla lily, carnation, Christmas cherry, daffodil (including paperwhite narcissus), dieffenbachia, English holly and ivy, geranium, horse chestnut, hyacinth, hydrangea, iris, jack-in-the-pulpit, Jerusalem cherry, juniper, larkspur, laurel, lily-of-the-valley, mistletoe, oxalis, philodendron, rhododendron, spathe flower, string of pearls, tulip and yew tree.
Dieffenbachia (dumb cane) is just not worth having around and poinsettia, so common at this time of year, is very irritant.
Achieving similar results, two interior plants from the Dieffenbachia family used per 100 square feet of space, also help reduce air pollutants.
Four and one-half acres were richly landscaped with mammoth climbing philodendron, large dieffenbachia, red, droopy-tongued chenille plants, and clumps of bamboo and coconut palm trees.
Among those closely related to the voodoo lily -- and most familiar to North American houseplant collectors -- are members of the genuses Dieffenbachia, Philodendron and Monstera.