dicotyledon

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Related to Dicots: Monocots

di·cot·yl·ed·on

(dī-kot'il-ē'don),
Plant (shrub, herb, or tree) with seeds that consist of two cotyledons, that is, the primary or rudimentary leaf of the embryo of seed plants.
Dicotyledonclick for a larger image
Fig. 131 Dicotyledon . The differences between dicotyledons and monocotyledons.

dicotyledon

any flowering plant of the subclass Dicotyledonae, class Angiospermae. Other ANGIOSPERMS belong to the subclass Monocotyledonae (see MONOCOTYLEDON). See figs. 131 and 171 .
References in periodicals archive ?
Monoecious dicots are in the genera Boehmeria, Dysopsis, and Urtica, and there are several monoecious Cyperaceae.
Thus, it makes the whole structure similar to the rhytidome of conifers and dicots in appearance (Fig.
230) The examiner clearly understood this new language to limit the claim to dicots.
temminckii at Sequoyah NWR most frequently consumed plants (dicots and monocots; 79%), fish (67%), insects (67%), and seeds of dicots (54%).
The transformed monocot cells were foreseeable after-arising technology, and thus known concepts on the date of filing, because the distinction between monocots and dicots was well known in the art and the value of transformed monocots had been recognized.
The PAO enzyme is conserved across a wide range of plants, both monocots and dicots, which implies that the gene coding for it was present early in plant evolution.
In particular, the matrix polysaccharides of grasses and other recently evolved monocots (plants with single seed leaves and parallel veination) are quite distinct from those of dicots (plants with two seed leaves and branched veins) (table 1) (Carpita 1996).
In some plants, rigidly fixed anthers may have evolved from versatile anthers as bees replaced generalist visitors, being versatile anthers commonly found in both monocots and dicots, in some basal taxonomic groups as well as many advanced ones (D'Arcy, 1996).
A total of 19 families were reported in both the sites and among them 12 were dicots and 7 monocots.
As we explore the possible explanations for those regular patterns of holes, we eventually touch on how monocots grow and how they are different from dicots.
We will report on the presence of p80 homologs in angiosperms, and consider how well it is conserved between dicots and monocots.