dicotyledon

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Related to Dicots: Monocots

di·cot·yl·ed·on

(dī-kot'il-ē'don),
Plant (shrub, herb, or tree) with seeds that consist of two cotyledons, that is, the primary or rudimentary leaf of the embryo of seed plants.
Dicotyledonclick for a larger image
Fig. 131 Dicotyledon . The differences between dicotyledons and monocotyledons.

dicotyledon

any flowering plant of the subclass Dicotyledonae, class Angiospermae. Other ANGIOSPERMS belong to the subclass Monocotyledonae (see MONOCOTYLEDON). See figs. 131 and 171 .
References in periodicals archive ?
Previously, CpCDV has been noted down to attack the legumes but with lapse of time, they expand their host range and infected other dicot families as well, like pepper (in India and Oman) and tomato (Byun et al.
Pattern formation in the vascular system of monocot and dicot plant species.
There was an additive effect when vegetation height was included with decreasing percentage dicot cover ([w.
While genes for the synthesis of many of the major matrix components of dicots have been defined (Farrokhi et al.
The class Liliopsida represents monocot plants, and Magnoliopsida represents dicot plants.
As seeds, the monocots (mono, "one"; cot, "cotyledon") have only a single cotyledon, or embryonic leaf; the dicots (di, "two") have two.
Mowing removes the growing point of dicots and may result in serious injury.
Xylem and phloem are arranged in a consistent manner in plants, depending on whether they are monocots or dicots, the two major classes of flowering plants (Fig.
As we explore the possible explanations for those regular patterns of holes, we eventually touch on how monocots grow and how they are different from dicots.
We catalogued dicots (broadleaves) appearing as volunteers from August through October 2006.
Four introduced dicots were present on the transects (Table 2).
This newest addition to the definitive work carries on amongst the dicots, listing 740 species in 74 genera and three families, including Caryophyllales (pink order), Polygonales (Buckwheat order) and Plumbaginales (Leadwort order).