diamond

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Dia·mond

(dī'mŏnd),
L. S., U.S. researcher, b. 1920. See: Diamond TYM medium.

Dia·mond

(dī'mŏnd),
Diabetes Mondiale. An international epidemiologic study of type 1 diabetes in children conducted from 1990–1999, which assessed 31,000 children in 53 countries
Conclusion The range of global variation in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes is larger than previously described and appears to follow ethnic and racial distribution

diamond,

n a crystalline carbon substance, the hardest natural substance known, used industrially and in dentistry for cutting and grinding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zharkov said that real volumes of diamond mining will hinge on the international demand for rough diamonds.
Overview of Congo Democratic Republic's Diamond mining industry, with detailed information about rough Diamond production, consumption and trade
Zimra gave the breakdown of the amounts owed by the diamond mining companies as follows: Marange US $5 million, Mbada US $22,4 million, DMC US $11 million and ZMDC US $18,3 million.
Overview of Russia's Diamond mining industry, with detailed information about rough Diamond production, consumption and trade
Rising global economic growth and increasing household wealth in the United States, China and India are boosting the diamond mining and processing industry in central and southern Africa - the world's largest and most concentrated source of diamonds.
The future of the diamond mining at Northwest Territories of Canada lays on the acquisition of BHP Billiton Ekati diamond mine by the Harry Winston diamond mines ltd.
Legend's diamond mining tenements are divided into five project areas
Basil Read a South African construction company declared the contract won through a joint venture that consists of Basil Read Mining, Leighton International and Bothakga Burrow Botswana, for carrying out diamond mining at Debswana in Botswana.
Williamson, the discoverer of the site, first owner and namesake of the mine, named the site "Mwadui" after a local chief; "Williamson" and "Mwadui" are now virtually synonymous in the diamond mining world.
I even saw skilled African workers in Botswana sorting, cutting and polishing diamonds, a complete contradiction to what Americans believe about the diamond mining process.