diamine

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di·a·mine

(dī'ă-mēn, -min),
An organic compound containing two amine groups per molecule, for example, ethylenediamine, NH2CH2CH2NH2.

diamine

(dī-ăm′ĭn) (-ēn)
A chemical compound with two amino, —NH2, groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, involvement of a flexible co-monomer DOCDA reduces the polyimide chain--chain interaction and disrupts the interaction with the aromatic moieties of ODA or p-BAPS diamines.
Simple coating formulations were made by dissolving 10 g of the epoxidized polymer and a stoichometric amount of diamine (2.
In a 100 ml three-necked flask, two kinds of diamines were dissolved in NMP solution.
The relatively small-sized cells obtained with diamine (TDA and EDA) implies that gelling reactions are catalyzed by the initiator amine during the foaming process as urethane forming reactions are catalyzed by amine.
With different diamine ratios, as the activity and chemical structure of the two diamines are different, polymerization processes are different and the molecular chains would have different binding patterns and terminal groups.
The polycondensations of diamines with diacids and diesters are very different.
All stoichiometric systems of diesters or polyesters and diamines, which ended in crosslinking are collected in Scheme 4.
The quinone diimines are prepared by the oxidation of the commonly used p-phenylene diamine antidegradants.
The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the influence of MMT modified with poly(oxyethylene) as well as poly(oxypropylene) monoamines and diamines on the exfoliation behavior as well as on the properties of the finally resulting NC.
Unilink - These are room temperature liquid secondary aromatic diamines with a bulky alkyl substituted on the amine which results in moderate reactivity and reduced hardness.
A notable example is Torlon (Amoco Chemicals Corporation), which was prepared from trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and various diamines [4].
Paraphenylene diamines are powerful antidegradants but eventually they are consumed and the rubber article becomes vulnerable to degradation.