dialect

(redirected from Dialects)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dialect

[dī′əlekt]
a variation of spoken language different from other forms of the same language in pronunciation, syntax, and word meanings. A particular dialect is usually shared by members of an ethnic group, socioeconomic group, or people living together in a geographic area.

dialect

Sociology A sublanguage system spoken in a region or by a particular group of people. See Ebonics. Cf Jargon, Slang.

di·a·lect

(dī'ă-lekt)
The aggregate of generally local shifts in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary from a perceived less localized standard.
References in classic literature ?
The dialect is that of the Northwest Midland, scarcely more intelligible to modern readers than Anglo-Saxon, but it indicates that the author belonged to the same border region between England and Wales from which came also Geoffrey of Monmouth and Laghamon, a region where Saxon and Norman elements were mingled with Celtic fancy and delicacy of temperament.
In order to give his language the appearance of antiquity, he rejected every word that was modern, and produced a dialect entirely different from any that had ever been spoken in Great Britain.
It is one thing to make use of the language and sentiments which are common to ourselves and our forefathers, and it is another to invest them with the sentiments and dialect exclusively proper to their descendants.
In that time he acquired a somewhat ready facility in the use of that dialect, by means of which he was to carry the instructions of spiritual truth to the men of the forest, though as late as 1649 he still lamented his want of skill in this respect.
The dialect was on her tongue to some extent, despite the village school: the characteristic intonation of that dialect for this district being the voicing approximately rendered by the syllable UR, probably as rich an utterance as any to be found in human speech.
I could not away with that dialect, and I could not then feel the charm of the poet's wit, nor the tender beauty of his pathos.
As he paused at the side of a tent before which sat a number of native soldiers he caught a few words spoken in native dialect that riveted his attention instantly: "The Waziri fought like devils; but we are greater fighters and we killed them all.
Make no sound," he cautioned in the man's own tribal dialect as he released his hold upon the other's throat.
She had thought him ignorant and stupid but a short day before, and now, within the past twenty-four hours, she had learned that he spoke not only English but French as well, and the primitive dialect of the West Coast.
The inhabitants of Shetland know him far and wide, under a name in their dialect which means, being interpreted, "The Master of Books.
1) In diction, dialect and style it is obviously dependent upon Homer, and is therefore considerably later than the "Iliad" and "Odyssey": moreover, as we have seen, it is in revolt against the romantic school, already grown decadent, and while the digamma is still living, it is obviously growing weak, and is by no means uniformly effective.
FSI recognizes the importance of localized vocabulary and pronunciation and has expanded language instruction in dialects.