diacritic

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diacritic

 [di″ah-krit´-ik]
diagnostic; distinguishing.

di·a·crit·ic

, diacritical (dī'ă-krit'ik, -krit'i-kăl),
Distinguishing; diagnostic; allowing of distinction.
[G. diakritikos, able to distinguish]

diacritic

(dī′ə-krĭt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Diacritical.
2. Medicine Diagnostic or distinctive.
n.
A mark, such as the cedilla of façade or the acute accents of résumé, added to a letter to indicate a special phonetic value or distinguish words that are otherwise graphically identical.

di·a·crit·ic

, diacritical (dī-ă-krit'ik, -i-kăl)
Distinguishing; diagnostic; allowing of distinction.
[G. diakritikos, able to distinguish]

diacritic

diagnostic; distinguishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The application automatically places diacritics in Arabic
There is also considerable evidence for diacritic reduplication of consonants in Old English in MSS of Northumbrian provenance.
See also, Samir Haddad, "A Genealogy of Violence, from Light to the Autoimmune," diacritics, 38 (1-2) (2008), 129.
The way diacritics are made depends on the linguistic diversity of designers.
The use of diacritics - small marks added to letters to indicate pronunciation or distinguish between similar words - dates to ancient times, and has long been common in beginning reading programs.
A section on "Abbreviations" was handy, but I found little use for the "Guide to Czech Diacritics and Pronunciation.
It makes use of diacritics to distinguish between vowel phonemes that appear identical without the diacritics.
Unfortunately, the book has no index; neither does the Arabic or Syriac include all the pointing and diacritics.
The basis for this spelling system was an antique script where various diacritics were added.
The second group of three essays were first published in a 1973 special issue of Diacritics.
In closing, The Practice of Cultural Analysis features an essay by Jonathan Culler, editor of the journal Diacritics, in which he reflects on the field of cultural studies in both the United States and Britain and its relationship to the discipline of Cultural Analysis.
The current Dinka orthography deviates from the Rejaf orthography through the use of diacritics to indicate 'breathy' vowels.