DiGeorge's syndrome

DiGeorge's syndrome

 [dĭ-jor´jez]
a condition in which a child is born without a thymus gland, resulting in a complete absence of functional T cells. Normal B cell function is present.

DiGeorge's syndrome

[dijôrj′əz]
Etymology: Angelo M. DiGeorge, American physician, b. 1921
a congenital disorder characterized by severe immunodeficiency and structural abnormalities, including hypertelorism; notched, low-set ears; small mouth; downward slanting eyes; cardiovascular defects; and absence of the thymus and parathyroid glands. Death, often as a result of infection, usually occurs before 2 years of age. Rarely transplantation of a human fetal thymus is performed. Also called thymic hypoplasia, thymic parathyroid aplasia.
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DiGeorge's syndrome

DiGeorge's syndrome

an immunodeficiency syndrome in humans and mice, associated with thymic hypoplasia or aplasia and absence of T lymphocytes, resulting from a congenital absence of the third and fourth branchial pouches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Renewed immunity A thymus-tissue transplant enabled babies that were born with DiGeorge's syndrome to develop functional immune systems (164: 69).
Sixteen-month-old Justin suffers from a rare immune disorder, DiGeorge's Syndrome, and must stay inside his Sylmar home or risk contracting viruses he cannot fight.
Clinicians estimate that DiGeorge's syndrome affects 1 in 4,000 newborns and is the second most common cause of congenital heart defects.
Justin suffers from DiGeorge's Syndrome, an immune-system deficiency that poses the threat of deadly infection and prevents him from going outside, Lopez said.