dharma

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dharma

Ayurvedic medicine
An ayurvedic term referring to one's divine purpose or spiritual path.
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This reformulation clarifies the intention of the classification, namely that these pertain to the verdict, which is only one step of the judicial process, even though it leaves the three ambiguous terms of the first line, dharma, vyavahara, and caritra, untouched and needing explanation.
Of these, dharma rests on truth, (3) vyavahara on witnesses, caritra on what is recorded in books, and decree is king's order.
Thus, dharma is when the verdict is based either on an ordeal or on the admission of guilt by the defendant.
The remaining dharma texts either do not explicitly list the sources or give only the standard three found in the Dharmasutras.
I will now present several (and certainly most) of the Dharmasastra commentarial explanations of atmatusti as a source of dharma in Sanskrit and in English translation.
The root of dharma is the entire Veda, the tradition and practice of those who know it, the standards of good people, and what pleases oneself.
Those who have made devoted prayers, in the future, the latter times, will obtain in their hands (mdo 'di lag tu 'thob pa) this sutra which was spoken by the king of dharma.
For immeasurable hundreds of thousands of myriads of kotis of incalcuable kalpas, I practiced this Dharma of highest, complete enlightenment, which is hard to attain.
We two will ensure that this dharmaparyaya will come into the hands of dharma preachers and those sons or daughters of good family who produced roots of virtue.
Dharma is important to the Ramayana and Mahabharata, too, but are or were they really dharmasastra, even including the at-best-fragmentary dharmasastra-style books of the Mahabharata?
Those differences are presented as tensions in a unitary view of dharma, rather than as fundamental disagreements about what dharma is, how one knows it, and how one does it.
Isn't it possible that dharma in the dharmasastra is quite distinct from dharma in the Mahabharata, and yet consistent within a describable range in its own lineage of thought?