dextran

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Related to Dextrans: dextran 40

dextran

 [dek´stran]
a water-soluble polysaccharide of glucose produced by the action of Leuconostoc mesenteroides on sucrose; used as an artificial plasma extender.

dex·tran

(deks'tran),
1. Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers (ranging between MW 1,000 and 40,000,000); produced by the action of members of the family Lactobacillaceae and certain other microorganisms on sucrose; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution for the treatment of shock, and in distilled water for the relief of the edema of nephrosis; lower molecular weight dextran (for example, MW 40,000 designated as dextran 40) improves blood flow in areas of stasis by reducing cellular aggregation.
See also: dextransucrase.
2. α-1,6-glucan with branch points (1,2; 1,3; 1,4) that are spaced in a manner characteristic of the individual species; used as plasma substitutes or expanders.
See also: dextransucrase.

dextran

/dex·tran/ (dek´stran) a high-molecular-weight polymer of d-glucose, produced by enzymes on the cell surface of certain lactic acid bacteria. Dextrans formed from sucrose by bacteria in the mouth adhere to the tooth surfaces and produce dental plaque. Uniform molecular weight dextrans from Leuconostoc mesenteroides preparations are used as plasma volume expanders, with specific preparations named for their average molecular weight.

dextran

(dĕk′străn′, -strən)
n.
Any of a group of branched polysaccharides with various molecular weights that are used to prevent thrombosis, as plasma volume expanders, and as food additives.

dextran

Transfusion medicine Dextran-40, dextran-70, dextran-1 A colloid-type volume expander consisting of a large glycogen-like molecules which may occasionally be used in surgical blood management by hemodilution; these substances have the desired properties of being viscid, and gelatinous, resulting in oncotic pressure to retain fluids in vessels; they are widely used as replacement fluids and volume expanders Pros ↓ Allogeneic transfusions, ↓ postoperative bleeding, ↓ blood viscosity Cons Interferes with platelet and RBC function, crossmatching; may cause anaphylaxis and peripheral edema. See Colloid solutions, Crystalloids, Hemodilution, Surgical blood management.

dex·tran

(deks'tran)
Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution for the treatment of shock, and in distilled water for the relief of the edema of nephrosis; lower molecular weight dextran.
See also: dextransucrase

dex·tran

(deks'tran)
Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution to treat shock and to relieve edema of nephrosis.

dextran (dek´stran),

n (C6H10O5) a water-soluble polymer of glucose of high molecular weight. A purified form, having an average molecular weight of 75,000, is used in a 6% concentration in isotonic sodium chloride solution to expand plasma volume and maintain blood pressure in emergency treatment of hemorrhagic and traumatic shock.

dextran

a water-soluble polysaccharide of glucose (dextrose) produced by the action of Leuconostoc mesenteroides on sucrose; used as a plasma volume extender. Several preparations of dextran are used as anticoagulants.

dextran 40
used as an adjuvant in blood transfusion, an anticoagulant.
dextran sulfate
used as an anticoagulant and recently investigated for its antiviral activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The permeability of epithelial junctions was probed with small (<1 kDa) fluorescent dyes (Bodipy, Life Technologies; and CF 488, Biotium, Fremont, CA) and fluorescein-conjugated dextrans (4, 10, 40, and 70 kDa, Life Technologies; 147 kDa, Sigma-Aldrich, St.
Dextran is also an excellent biocompatible polysaccharide for hydrophilic coating.
The dextrans from the new strain may act as so-called prebiotics, non-digestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth or activity of bacteria in the digestive system and which are beneficial to health.
Interestingly, the 70 kDa dextran accumulated in the microsphere walls to levels exceeding its concentration in solution, a behavior not seen with any of the larger or smaller dextrans (Fig.
Tenkanen said: "The advantage of this new strain of bacteria is that while it produces 10 times more dextran than products on the market now, it doesn't produce large amounts of acid.
The higher incidence of adverse events with IV iron dextran is reflected in the fact that a test dose is required prior to administration (Watson Pharma, Inc.
The dextran (MW = 70,000) was obtained from Sigma-Aldrich Chemical (St.
Scientists investigated aqueous dispersions of mixtures of alginate, caseinate, gelatine and dextran.
President George Usher said that tests completed at the University of Alberta have shown that Usherdex 4, the company's proprietary form of dextran, actually thins mucus in the lungs, an important strategy for fighting cystic fibrosis.
Contrary to native dextrans, temperature has a strong effect on the viscometric parameters of amphiphilic dextrans.
An example of EPS is the use of LAB dextrans or polymers of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose residues as additive.