dew point

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point

 [point]
1. a small area or spot; the sharp end of an object.
2. to approach the surface, like the pus of an abscess, at a definite spot or place.
3. a tapered, pointed endodontic instrument used for exploring the depth of the root canal in root canal therapy; called also root canal point.
point A a radiographic, cephalometric landmark, determined on the lateral head film; it is the most retruded part of the curved bony outline from the anterior nasal spine to the crest of the maxillary alveolar process.
absorbent point in root canal therapy, a cone of variable width and taper, usually made of paper or a paper product, used to dry or maintain a liquid disinfectant in the canal. Called also paper point.
point B a radiographic, cephalometric landmark, determined on the lateral head film; it is the most posterior midline point in the concavity between the infradentale and pogonion.
boiling point the temperature at which a liquid will boil; at sea level the boiling point of water is 100°C (212°F).
cardinal p's
1. the points on the different refracting media of the eye that determine the direction of the entering or emerging light rays.
2. four points within the pelvic inlet— the two sacroiliac articulations and the two iliopectineal eminences.
craniometric p's the established points of reference for measurement of the skull.
dew point the temperature at which moisture in the atmosphere is deposited as dew.
far point the most remote point at which an object is clearly seen when the eye is at rest.
point of fixation
1. the point or object on which one's sight is fixed and through which the axis opticus passes.
2. the point on the retina, usually the fovea, on which are focused the rays coming from an object directly regarded.
freezing point the temperature at which a liquid begins to freeze, for water, 0°C (32°F); it is often used interchangeably with melting point, but should be used for substances being cooled while melting point is reserved for substances being heated.
gutta-percha point gutta-percha cone.
ice point the true melting point of ice, being the temperature of equilibrium between ice and air-saturated water under one atmosphere pressure.
isoelectric point (pI) the pH of a solution in which molecules of a specific substance, such as a protein, have equal numbers of positively and negatively charged groups and therefore do not migrate in an electric field.
J point on an electrocardiogram, the junction between the end of the QRS segment and the beginning of the ST segment.
jugal point the point at the angle formed by the masseteric and maxillary edges of the zygomatic bone; called also jugale.
lacrimal point a small aperture on a slight elevation at the medial end of the eyelid margin, through which tears from the lacrimal lake enter the lacrimal canaliculi. See also lacrimal apparatus.
point of maximal impulse the point on the chest where the impulse of the left ventricle is sometimes felt or seen most strongly, normally in the fifth costal interspace inside the mammillary line.
McBurney point a point of special tenderness in appendicitis, about 4 to 5 cm from the right anterior iliac spine on a line between the spine and the navel; it corresponds to the normal position of the appendix.
McBurney's point is located midway between the anterior iliac crest and the umbilicus in the right lower quadrant. From Ignatavicius and Workman, 2002.
melting point (mp) the minimum temperature at which a solid begins to liquefy; see also freezing point.
near point the nearest point of clear vision, the absolute near point being that for either eye alone with accommodation relaxed, and the relative near point being that for the two eyes together with employment of accommodation.
nodal p's two points on the axis of an optical system situated so that a ray falling on one will produce a parallel ray emerging through the other.
paper point absorbent point.
pressure point
1. a point of extreme sensitivity to pressure.
2. one of various locations on the body at which digital pressure may be applied for the control of hemorrhage.
Locations of pressure points. Shaded areas show the regions in which hemorrhage may be controlled by pressure at the points indicated.
root canal point point (def. 3).
silver point in root canal therapy, a tapered and elongated silver plug that is cemented into the canal as a filling. Called also silver cone.
trigger point a spot on the body at which pressure or other stimulus gives rise to specific sensations or symptoms.
triple point the temperature and pressure at which the solid, liquid, and gas phases of a substance are in equilibrium.

dew point

the temperature at and below which moisture will condense for a specific humidity.

dew point

[dyo̅o̅]
the temperature at which air becomes saturated with water vapor and the water vapor condenses to liquid. In aerosol therapy, water may condense on containers, tubing, and other surfaces when the dew point is reached.

point

1. a small area or spot; the sharp end of an object.
2. to approach the surface, like the pus of an abscess, at a definite spot or place.
3. a single tine of an antler.
4. extremities of a sheep fleece which has been removed from the sheep and laid out on a classing table.

auricular point
the center of the opening of the external acoustic meatus.
boiling point
the temperature at which a liquid will boil: at sea level, 212°F (100°C).
point of buttock
the prominence caused by the ischial tuberosity.
point of croup
highest point of the croup; caused by the sacral tuberosity.
dew point
the temperature at which moisture in the atmosphere is deposited as dew.
point of the elbow
the summit of the olecranon process.
point firing
see firing.
freezing point
the temperature at which a liquid begins to freeze; for water, 32°F (0°C).
point of the hip
the most lateral point of the hip; caused by the coxal tuberosity.
point of the hock
the summit of the calcaneus.
ice point
the temperature of equilibrium between ice and air-saturated water under one atmosphere pressure.
isobestic point
the wavelength at which two substances have the same absorptivity.
isoelectric point (pI)
the pH of a solution in which molecules of a specific substance, such as a protein, have equal numbers of positively and negatively charged groups and therefore do not migrate in an electric field.
lacrimal point
lacrimal puncta.
point of lay
the age of sexual maturity in female fowls.
point of maximal impulse (PMI)
the point on the chest where the impulse of the left ventricle is felt most strongly. It is usually on the left chest wall, around the area of the 5th costochondral junction.
melting point
the minimum temperature at which a solid begins to liquefy.
nodal p's
two points on the axis of an optical system situated so that a ray falling on one will produce a parallel ray emerging through the other.
point outbreak
see point epidemic.
paper point
very fine, tapered swabs used in endodontics to dry up the root canal.
point prescriptions
details of the exact needle procedures and locations of insertions for the treatment of specific diseases.
point prevalence rate
the proportion of the animals in a population at a point in time which are affected by the subject disease at that point. Called also instantaneous prevalence.
point selection
can be based on a table of prescriptions for specific diseases, or on the basis of which acupoints are tender, or on the basis of the innervation of the area of the lesion, and so on for a series of 11, and possibly more, strategies.
point of the shoulder
the point over the greater tubercle of the humerus.
point source epidemic
see point epidemic.
point of the sternum
the most cranial point of the sternum, caused by the manubrium.
trigger point
a spot on the body at which pressure or other stimulus gives rise to specific sensations or clinical signs.
triple point
the temperature and pressure at which the solid, liquid, and gas phases of a substance are in equilibrium.
References in periodicals archive ?
We're very proud to be included in such an esteemed group of companies," stated Dewpoint president and CEO Andy Kotarba.
Dewpoint will continue to offer the training and education solutions, content management and Java(TM) applications, previously available by Centrifusion.
NovaWhcel boasts a no - slip/ no - break chain drive that guarantees uniform desiccant - wheel rotations and uniform -40 F dewpoint.
Dewpoint will be able to help clients make better decisions about utilizing technology to streamline and support business operations.
Outlet dewpoints from +15[degrees] to -40[degrees]C can be achieved at 7 barg pressure (12.
We believe that Zaplet 3 is an innovative BPM application that leverages the most common communications vehicle, email, to deliver solutions that will enable customers to rapidly collaborate, eliminate process inefficiencies and respond faster," said Rob Mock, President and CEO of Dewpoint.
The merger was part of a strategy by Integration Projects and Dewpoint to gather critical mass -- to become bigger, faster and capitalize on the e-business explosion.
With this approach to their web platform, Dewpoint helped World Book achieve some of their goals for an integrated infrastructure, one of which was to create an external customer face that would not even hesitate if an internal outage were to occur," said Rob Mock, president & CEO of Dewpoint.
This maintains the lowest possible running costs coupled with regeneration at the lowest energy tariff whilst also ensuring that the compressed air inlet conditions are matched to the dewpoint required.
If the dryer has a dewpoint sensor, it would be set at -40 C/F.
A complete hand-held weather station, the pocket-sized Kestrel 4000 measures every major environmental condition: barometric pressure, altitude, density altitude, temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind chill, dewpoint, wet bulb temperature and heat stress.