desiccation

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Related to Dessication: lyophilization

desiccation

 [des″ĭ-ka´shun]
the act of drying.

des·ic·ca·tion

(des'i-kā'shŭn),
The process of being desiccated.
Synonym(s): dehydration (4) , exsiccation (1)

desiccation

Medtalk → Vox populi Drying

des·ic·ca·tion

(des'i-kā'shŭn)
The process of being desiccated.
Synonym(s): dehydration (4) , exsiccation (1) .

desiccation

the process by which a substance is dried out and the moisture removed. This is often carried out in a desiccator, which contains a substance which will take up water, such as calcium chloride.

desiccation

separation of a skin lesion from underlying healthy tissue, using low-current electrosurgery

desiccation

The process of becoming dry. See dry eye.

des·ic·ca·tion

(des'i-kā'shŭn)
The process of being desiccated.
Synonym(s): dehydration (4) , exsiccation (1) .

desiccation (des´ikā´shən),

n an excessive loss of moisture; the process of drying up. See also electrocoagulation.

desiccation

the act of drying.

desiccation keratitis
see keratoconjunctivitis sicca.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment of this neoplasm consists of surgery, durretage and dessication, liquid nitrogen destruction, radiation, and other intralesional, topical or systemic agents.
Opening of dessication fractures to depths of up to 3 m (Weisner and Acworth 1999) can result in leaching of salts.
Dessication and rehydration experiments on leaves of 43 Pteridophyte species.
Encapsulation-dehydration involves the placement of explants in sodium-alginate beads, and the subsequent progressive ornon-progressive dessication in the presence of high sucrose concentrations, which beneficially affect the germplasm tolerance to the air-drying and ice crystal growth during freezing [16].
Meanwhile, although the hydrodynamic modeling indicated that channel velocities would not increase enough to resuspend potentially FC-rich sediment (Spaulding & Grilli 2005), somewhat increased flood-tidal flow velocity and much-increased tide heights would shift fine-sediment deposition from river channels to the wetland surface, where both dessication and light would depress FC survival (Bordalo et al.
Amphibians have evolved strategies to cope with harsh changes in natural conditions, including dessication of temporary water sources (24).
These changes in the hydrologic cycle may negatively affect mussels by increasing the size of flood events (which may wash away mussels to less suitable habitat or harm them through scouring by sediment) and by increasing the risk of dessication during low flow events.
35, for example, there is a subordinate modifier, 'vertic', that refers to a soil with dessication cracks or slickensides.
During that time the population continued to increase, and, just as importantly for housing availability, had redistributed itself in response to major crises such as the collapse of markets and the dessication of the western wheat lands.
The TransUniversal Needle Ablation or TUNA 5 System was recently cleared by the FDA for use in coagulation and dessication of soft tissue.
The mortality of the transplanted seedlings in the forest is high (greater than 40%) due to dessication in severe heat.
Overlying the marine sediments, the scientists found "evaporites," sediments laid down during the dessication of the Mediterranean about 5 million years ago.