Desferoxamine

Desferoxamine

The primary drug used in iron chelation therapy. It aids in counteracting the life-threatening buildup of iron in the body associated with long-term blood transfusions.
Mentioned in: Thalassemia
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of desferoxamine and ferrostatin-1 on the cytotoxicity of artenimol of CCRF-CEM cells was determined by resazurin assays.
Therapeutic phlebotomies are more effective than either desferoxamine or EDTA.
Acquired factors include bone marrow expansion secondary to ineffective erythropiesis with cortical thinning, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, diabetes mellitus, direct toxic effects of iron overload on osteoblast number and activity, deleterious effects of desferoxamine on the bone metabolism, the negative impact of chelation therapy on fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis, calcium and zinc deficiencies, low vitamin D levels due to aberrant vitamin D-parathyroid hormone axis and reduced physical activity (8-13).
The effects of desferoxamine and ascorbate on oxidative stress in the streptozotocin diabetic rat.
he team found high oxidative stress in mice with cerebral malaria and also found that treating them with and two antioxidant agents, desferoxamine and N-acetylcysteine prevented both inflammatory and vascular changes in the tissues of the brain, as well as the development of persistent cognitive damage.
5]-mediated DNA damage was abolished by superoxide dismutase, catalase, and desferoxamine, implicating the superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, and the hydroxyl radical in the reactions inducing DNA damage.
The patient was not prescribed [alpha]-methyldopa, desferoxamine, or calcium dobesilate because, at therapeutic concentrations, these medications may cause artefactually low uric acid concentrations, as documented in the manufacturer's product insert.
Effects of iron and desferoxamine on Rhizopus infection.
The authentication of pHRE-Luc was confirmed by its activation in exposing to desferoxamine (DFO), which was frequently used to mimic the effect of hypoxia (Zheng et al.