derivative

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de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv),
1. Relating to or producing derivation.
2. Something produced by modification of something preexisting.
3. Specifically, a chemical compound that may be produced from another compound of similar structure in one or more steps, as in replacement of H by an alkyl, acyl, or amino group.

derivative

/de·riv·a·tive/ (dĕ-riv´ah-tiv) a chemical substance produced from another substance either directly or by modification or partial substitution.

derivative

[dəriv′ətiv]
Etymology: L, derivare, to turn away
anything that originates in another substance or object. For example, organs and tissues are derivatives of the primordial germ cells. Chemical derivatives may be produced to confirm identification of a compound or to aid in the analysis of a compound.

de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv)
1. Relating to or producing derivation.
2. Something produced by modification of something preexisting.
3. Specifically, a chemical compound produced from another compound in one or more steps, as in replacement of H by an alkyl, acyl, or amino group.

derivative

the result of the calculation (usually with calculus) of the change of one variable with respect to another. Also alludes to the number of 'steps' of calculus required (e.g. acceleration is the second derivative of displacement with respect to time). See also differentiation.

de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv)
Chemical compound that may be produced from another compound of similar structure in one or more steps.

derivative (dēriv´ətiv),

n a chemical substance that is the result of a chemical reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the calculation of variances of fitted plane parameters, the following derivatives of D([theta], [phi], [P.
Real estate is the largest asset class not currently taking full advantage of derivatives," said Don Fewer, senior managing director for GFI, North America.
If the hedged asset were measured at fair value, the changes in values of the hedged item and the credit derivative may offset each other, reducing the volatility that arises when only the derivative is marked to market and not the hedged item.
Many international corporations, for example, use currency derivatives to swap out their exposure to exchange rate fluctuations.
As broad as the field of derivative accounting is, much of the concern over the rules is that they are too broad.
133 permits this special accounting for the change in value of derivatives designated and qualifying as fair value hedges, cash flow hedges or foreign currency hedges (see sidebar "FASB 133 Hedge Definitions").
The big difference between a derivative contract and a reinsurance contract is that the correlation between exposure and nonperformance is likely to be high in the case of reinsurance, whereas it is low with derivatives.
We're one of fewer than 10 investment banks that have a significant presence in the municipal derivatives market and the only firm that is not a major money-center bank," notes Rice from his office on the 52nd floor in the World Trade Center.
There are currently $70 trillion worth of derivatives being traded worldwide - nearly 10 times the U.
I'm on a committee in which we talk about derivatives policy and good guidelines for the audit committee.
The warehouse decreases operational risk by automating manual, bilateral reconciliation and processing for Deriv/SERV's 750+ customers, which include global derivatives dealers, traditional asset managers, global investment banking firms, and hedge funds.