asylum

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a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm),
Older term for an institution for the housing and care of those who by reason of age or of mental or bodily infirmities are unable to care for themselves.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]

asylum

Global village
Protection given by a state (country) to a foreign person fleeing persecution in his or her own country. Asylum is given under the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees; to be recognised as a refugee, one must have left his or country and be unable to go back because he or she has a well-founded fear of persecution.

Medical history
An obsolete term for a healthcare facility for patients who are unable to care for themselves; e.g., institution. The choice of appropriate equivalent term for asylum is based on the nature of the underlying condition: for example, if the condition is mental, it may be designated as a psychiatric inpatient facility; if the institutionalisation is for a terminal physical condition (e.g., AIDS or cancer) it is termed hospice.

a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm)
Facility dedicated for the relief of care of the destitute or sick, especially those with mental illness.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]

asylum

A once compassionate but now pejorative term for a psychiatric hospital or an institution for the care of the elderly and infirm.
References in periodicals archive ?
84) Generally, the goal is reunification with a parent (which would be impossible in derivative asylum cases), or adoption (which would also be impossible, since the parents' rights have not been officially terminated).
90) This rule must be considered in derivative asylum cases as well.
While the Second Circuit recognized that "Congress already provides for family members elsewhere in the statute by authorizing derivative asylum status for spouses and children of individuals who qualify as "refugees" under 8 U.
2153, 2165 (2007) (arguing that derivative asylum rights should be extended to all Chinese nationals fleeing China's coercive population control programs, regardless of marital status).