dense granule

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dense granule

Cardiology
A specialised spherical storage and secretory vesicle in platelets which contains ADP, ATP, ionised calcium, pyrophosphate and serotonin. Reduced-platelet dense-granule secretion is associated with marked protection against arterial thrombosis, inflammation, and neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury in a mouse model.

Pathology
Dense-core granules, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
During invasion and creation of the PV membrane, apically oriented organelles called micronemes and rhoptries are discharged, followed later by release of dense granules content (DG).
The commonly reported mechanisms are decreased life span of platelets due to immunological and non-immunological mechanisms, elevated macrophage colony stimulating factors causing platelet destruction; ultra structural changes like centralization of dense granules, glycogen depletion, formation of pseudopods, and micro aggregation; consumption by diffused intravascular coagulation (DIC) host oxidative stress through oxidization of membrane lipids causing changes in fluidity and permeability of the cell membrane and its effect on fragility (2,3).
These methods can be combined with the use of platelet agonists to measure dense granules, as well as release, aggregation, microparticle formation, and platelet procoagulant activity.
Human platelets are secretory cells, and exocytosis is the mode of secretion which results in the release of a-granules, lysosomes and dense granules.
A variety of genetic abnormalities lead to dense granule (dense body, [delta]-granule) deficiency, most associated with albinism, where the number of dense granules is reduced.
In their inactivated state, platelets are roughly discoid in shape and contain cytoplasmic organelles, cytoskeletal elements, invaginating open-canalicular membrane systems, and platelet-specific granules, called alpha and dense granules.
Many degenerating and nondegenerated gonadotropes, somatotropes, and lactotropes showed dilated ER (Figures 3 and 5) and hypertrophic Golgi areas, occasionally with some lightly dense granules inside.
In order to invade the host cell they employ an arsenal of virulence factors derived from the specialised secretory organelles; the micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules that are sequentially secreted during the invasion process.
The electron dense granules were spherical, often different in size and measured 0.
The granulated cells (GC) are so called because they contain dense granules (serous type) with different sizes.
Rare electron dense granules and microfilaments were seen in these adipocytic cells.