politics

(redirected from Democratic movements)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Democratic movements: democracy, Arab Spring

politics,

n 1. the art and science of governance, particularly in a democracy or collegial body.
2. the interpersonal relationships noted within group interactions such as can occur in a dental office or clinic.
References in periodicals archive ?
This meant that all of the old state's entities were fine with the democratic movement to be at the forefront of the political scene.
Addressing a parliamentary delegation which returned from the meeting of the Inter-Parliamentary Union held in Panama, he noted that ratification of the Iranian delegation's proposal on supporting democratic movements in the Middle East and North Africa during the gathering was a great diplomatic achievement for the country.
He added that his contribution to the democratic movement in Nepal would be remembered forever.
For the Hong Kong government to prevent members of a democratic movement from mourning a fellow member after he dies is a disrespectful act and a serious matter.
DUSHANBE/ANKARA, May 31, 2009 (TUR) -- Turkey's president said on Saturday that it would be difficult to raise the standard of democratic movements where there was violence, terrorism and bloodshed.
Having frequently forged comfortable military relationships with reliably authoritarian administrations such as Park Chung Hee's in South Korea Chiang Kai-shek's in Taiwan, the United States has recently discovered that democratic movements in East Asia can pose an unpredictable and worrisome challenge to U.
As President Bush said in his second Inaugural Address: "So, it is the policy of the United States to seek and support the growth of democratic movements and institutions in every nation and culture, with the ultimate goal of ending tyranny in our world.
Bush's second-term commitment "to seek and support the growth of democratic movements and institutions in every nation and culture, with the ultimate goal of ending tyranny in our world," as the president put it in his second inaugural address.
By beginning with the frank acknowledgment that power is personal, radically democratic movements, such as the Industrial Areas Foundation, have moved toward constituting a deliberative democracy that is also, one might say, a set of "spiritual exercises": the cultivation of techniques for reflecting on the extent to which those of us who want to see past/through/into the ideologies of megastates and transnational corporations also feel and embody the "noetic effects of sin," or rather of power (the two are not to be equated), all the way down.
The United States supports the growth of democratic movements and institutions in every nation and culture, with the ultimate goal of ending tyranny in our world.
requests to isolate Palestinian terrorists, forgive Iraqi debts, hound international terrorism, subsidize democratic movements in the Middle East, contain Iran's nuclear weapons, etc.

Full browser ?