delayed sleep phase syndrome

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delayed sleep phase syndrome

A sleep disorder characterised by the inability to fall asleep for several hours after going to bed. Often related to abuse of alcohol or sleeping pills, the condition may respond to bright light therapy administered several hours before bedtime.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tasimelteon may also have applications in other CRSDs, including Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder, Jet Lag and Shift Worker Sleep Disorder.
International Classification of Sleep Disorders (American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 2005) Sleep disorders Clinical examples Insomnias--primary sleep disorders that cause: * Difficulty getting off to sleep Settling problems * Difficulty maintaining sleep Night waking * Non-restorative sleep Early waking Hypersomnias Narcolepsy, Kleine-Levin syndrome Parasomnias Night terrors, sleepwalking Circadian rhythm disorders Delayed sleep phase disorder, advanced sleep phase disorder Sleep-related movement disorders Restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, rhythmic movement disorder Sleep-related breathing disorders Obstructive sleep apnoea
Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is characterized by late sleeping and waking, on most nights, usually with a delay of more than two hours in relation to conventional or socially acceptable times.
The article on Circadian rhythm and sleep disorders (CRSD) (2) describes The International Classifications of Sleep Disorders-2 which recognizes 6 CRSDs [non-24-h disorder (free-running type), irregular sleep-wake phase disorder, advanced sleep phase disorder, delayed sleep phase disorder, Jet lag and shift-work disorder].
CRSD, another type of sleep disorder defined as the inability to sleep at usual or customary times, affects millions of Americans in a number of forms, including Shift Work Disorder, which affects 10% of Americans who are shift workers; Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder, which affects 5-10% of chronic insomnia patients; and Jet Lag Disorder, which typically affects air travelers crossing five or more time zones.