science

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sci·ence

(sī'ents),
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]

science

/sci·ence/ (si´ens)
1. the systematic observation of natural phenomena for the purpose of discovering laws governing those phenomena.
2. the body of knowledge accumulated by such means.scientif´ic

science

(sī′əns)
n.
1.
a. The observation, identification, description, experimental investigation, and theoretical explanation of phenomena: new advances in science and technology.
b. Such activities restricted to a class of natural phenomena: the science of astronomy.
2. A systematic method or body of knowledge in a given area: the science of marketing.

science

[sī′əns]
Etymology: L, scientia, knowledge
a systematic attempt to establish theories to explain observed phenomena and the knowledge obtained through these efforts. Pure science is concerned with the gathering of information solely for the sake of obtaining new knowledge. Applied science is the practical application of scientific theory and laws. See also hypothesis, law, scientific method, theory.

science

Vox populi The formal and systematic study of natural phenomena. See Big science, Fraud in science, Little science, Junk science, Misconduct in science, Prediction science, Pseudoscience.

sci·ence

(sī'ĕns)
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]
References in periodicals archive ?
To opponents of ID, I recommend the following: Do not play the demarcation game, that is, do not insist on definitions of science which try wholly to exclude ID.
5) One of the more popular modern definitions of science or "demarcation of science from non-science" is due to Popper who required that scientific statements be empirically falsifiable.
Teachers' individual definitions of science predisposed them to either accept or reject the processes of science writing as supportive of science learning.
Westfahl mostly eschews the oppositionalist rhetoric in this chapter, and the result is that he elucidates clearly the way in which the field developed as a set of arguments with itself, stretching the definitions of science fiction and mutating its mission statement until even the notion of such a thing is, at least to some, reprehensible.
The pattern you may see in these definitions of sciences is each is fairly short, but more notably, each begins with the phrase "the study of" Learning any of these sciences as studies of particular things makes the respective sciences immediately understandable to students, even schoolchildren.