necessity

(redirected from Defense of necessity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

necessity

 [nĕ-ses´ĭ-te]
something necessary or indispensable.
pharmaceutic necessity (pharmaceutical necessity) a substance having slight or no value therapeutically, but used in the preparation of various pharmaceuticals, including preservatives, solvents, ointment bases, and flavoring, coloring, diluting, emulsifying, and suspending agents.

necessity

/ne·ces·si·ty/ (nĕ-ses´ĭ-te) something necessary or indispensable.
pharmaceutical necessity  a substance having slight or no value therapeutically, but used in the preparation of various pharmaceuticals, including preservatives, solvents, ointment bases, and flavoring, coloring, diluting, emulsifying, and suspending agents.

necessity

[nĕses′te]
something necessary or indispensable.

necessity

See Medical necessity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the limited use of the defense of necessity for repetitive
158-59 (2006) (advocating the defense of necessity through the use of
Yet, as a matter of practice, federal courts have generally considered the defense of necessity only in situations where an individual seeks to avoid threats of serious bodily injury.
9 Cranch) 71, 76 (1815) (finding insufficient evidence for defense of necessity where ship had to sail for the West Indies to preserve cargo and protect lives of crew); Brig James Wells v.
From the text of this provision, it is evident that some of the requirements for the defense of necessity in customary international law have no place, or a limited one, under WTO law.
2001) (explaining that a defense of necessity suggests the justification of an otherwise unlawful act where balancing of evils averts a greater harm).
Whereas in the Alkmaar case the court held that the defense of necessity in the sense of "conflict of duties" was available to a doctor charged under Article 293, in its decision of 1988 the courts went further and accepted that the defense of necessity in the sense of "psychological compulsion" experienced by the doctor was also available.

Full browser ?