canon law

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canon law

A body of law and edicts that arise from and are adopted by an ecclesiastic authority, which guides how Christian organisations are governed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The arguments of those who rely upon decretals, whose neoteric proliferation is only internal to the Church, must be ousted from this debate.
To these must be added centuries of papal and episcopal magisterial pronouncements and conciliar and synodal decretals.
9) This sentence as well as the marginalia refer to Gratian's Decretals, see Corpus Iuris Canonici, ed.
His analysis of this concept is confined to thirteenth-century decretals and their decretalist commentators.
Peter Damian's experience of the Church led him to oppose the idea that bishops or popes stood above the law, a judgment justified by a forged collection of canon law popular with the clergy, the Pseudo-Isidorian Decretals.
He was Papal Chaplain and Penitentiary, a famous compiler of the Decretals of Gregory IX, at whose command he began in 1230 to prepare this new collection as a substitute for the collections that were subsequent to the Decree of Gratian.
This need for practicality, occasioned by the flood of papal decretals to England.
32) But he also did not hesitate to note that whereas Justinian had pared down the civil law to manageable compass, "there are now so many glosses, summas, writings, lectures, treatises, and libels that it seems impossible, let alone for both laws but just for the reading of the civil laws or of the decretals, that a man's life would be enough.
Clement was following the opinion of Gratian in the Decretals who had proposed that the marriage of pagans had validity but not indissolubility since it was not a sacramental marriage.
The Scholastic treatment goes some way beyond the ius poli or right to life of the Decretals, which tolerates theft in cases of extreme need.
This procedure calls forth a telling remark from John, comparing it to "the fashion when decretals or laws are promulgated.
Among the most important, we can identify the Digest, the Codice, and the Novel, while among the canonical sources the Decretum of Gratian and the Decretals of Gregory IX are counted.