oliguria

(redirected from Decreased urine output)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Decreased urine output: renal failure

oliguria

 [ol″ĭ-gu´re-ah]
diminished urine secretion in relation to fluid intake. adj., adj oligu´ric.

ol·i·gu·ri·a

(ol'i-gyū'rē-ă),
Scant urine production.
[oligo- + G. ouron, urine]

oliguria

/ol·i·gu·ria/ (ol″ĭ-gu´re-ah) diminished urine production and excretion in relation to fluid intake.oligu´ric

oliguria

(ŏl′ĭ-gyo͝or′ē-ə)
n.
Abnormally slight or infrequent urination.

oliguria

[ol′igyoo͡r′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, oligos + ouron, urine
a diminished capacity to form and pass urine-less than 500 mL in every 24 hours-so that the end products of metabolism cannot be excreted efficiently. It is usually caused by imbalances in body fluids and electrolytes, renal lesions, or urinary tract obstruction. Also called oliguresis. oliguric, adj. Compare anuria.
enlarge picture
Oliguria

oliguria

Nephrology Excretion of < 400 mL of urine/day

ol·i·gu·ri·a

(ol'i-gyūr'ē-ă)
Scanty urine production (i.e., less than 500 mL in 24 hours); results in inefficient excretion of the products of metabolism.
[oligo- + G. ouron, urine]

oliguria

An abnormally small output of urine. In health, the urinary output varies from 700 ml to 2 l. Oliguria is usually caused by inadequate fluid intake or increased fluid loss in sweating or diarrhoea. A more serious cause of oliguria is KIDNEY FAILURE, either acute or, less often, following long-term kidney disease.

oliguria (ōˈ·li·gōōˑ·rē·),

n a decrease in the excretion of urine from the body due to dehydration, an imbalance in electrolytes or body fluids, the presence of renal lesions, the obstruction of the urinary tract, or other causes. Also called
oliguresis.

ol·i·gu·ri·a

(ol'i-gyūr'ē-ă)
Scant urine production.
[oligo- + G. ouron, urine]

oliguria (ol´igyoo´rēə),

n a decreased output of urine (usually less than 500 ml/day), possibly asso-ciated with dehydration from diarrhea or excessive sweating, low fluid intake, lower nephron nephrosis resulting from burns, heavy metal poisoning, terminal renal disease, or an increase in extracellular fluid volume in untreated renal, cardiac, or hepatic disease.

oliguria

reduced daily output of urine. This has veterinary significance if the net intake is normal or if water is available ad lib; then it is a sign of renal insufficiency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Look at decreased urine output as a multi-factoral event.
If we do not replace the water lost through perspiration, urination, and defecation, the signs of dehydration then appear: decreased urine output, dry mucous membranes, and lightheadedness.
Patients should be instructed to immediately report symptoms of decreased urine output, sudden weight gain, fluid retention/edema, and/or shortness of breath (which may suggest kidney damage) to their physicians.

Full browser ?