Declaration of Hawaii

A statement by the World Psychiatric Association in 1977 on principles of good medical practice vis-à-vis teaching, research, and practice

Declaration of Hawaii

Ethical and practice guidelines developed by the World Psychiatric Association for the worldwide practice of psychiatry. It defines psychiatry as medical treatment of psychiatric disorders, requires maintenance and use of current clinical knowledge, and describes the parameters of the therapist–patient relationship and the need to safeguard an incapacitated or judgment-impaired individual's rights. Assessments are to be performed with full knowledge by the person being assessed, and confidentiality is protected in the course of the therapeutic intervention. Research is to be undertaken with the supervision of an ethical committee, and established rules are followed for research by individuals properly trained for research. See: Hippocratic oath;
See: Declaration of Geneva; Nightingale Pledge; Prayer of Maimonides
References in periodicals archive ?
Reaction to the Soviet misuse of psychiatry prompted the WPA's 1977 Declaration of Hawaii, the group's first position statement on psychiatric ethics, followed by an update in 1996, the Declaration of Madrid.
The earliest version of such ethical principles was the 1977 Declaration of Hawaii, which arose from concern about the political abuse of psychiatry and psychiatric patients in some countries at that time.
Consistent with a fundamental institutional concern present since its inception, the WPA approved in 1977 the Declaration of Hawaii, which set out ethical guidelines for the practice of psychiatry.

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