Declaration of Geneva


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Related to Declaration of Geneva: Hippocratic oath
An international standard first established in 1864 regarding the conduct of the military towards medical personnel, and the obligations of medical personnel during acts of war. The Geneva Conventions consist of four treaties and three additional protocols that set the standards in international law for humanitarian treatment of the victims of war. The singular term Geneva Convention refers to the agreements of 1949

Geneva Declaration

A general term that encompasses all iterations (1948, 1968, 1984, 1994, 2005, 2006) of the Declaration of Geneva, which is essentially a modern restatement of the Hippocratic Oath.

Declaration of Geneva
At the time of being admitted as a member of the medical profession:
• I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life to the service of humanity;
• I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude that is their due;
• I will practise my profession with conscience and dignity;
• The health of my patient will be my first consideration;
• I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
• I will maintain by all the means in my power the honour and the noble traditions of the medical profession;
• My colleagues will be my sisters and brothers;
• I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing, or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
• I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
• I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
• I make these promises solemnly, freely and upon my honor.

Declaration of Geneva

A statement adopted in 1948 by the Second General Assembly of the World Medical Association. Some medical schools use it at graduation exercises.

“At the time of being admitted as Member of the Medical Profession, I solemnly pledge myself to consecrate my life to the service of humanity. I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude which is their due; I will practice my profession with conscience and dignity. The health of my patient will be my first consideration; I will respect the secrets which are confided in me; I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honor and the noble traditions of the medical profession; my colleagues will be my brothers; I will not permit considerations of religion, nationality, race, party politics, or social standing to intervene between my duty and my patient; I will maintain the utmost respect for human life, from the time of conception; even under threat, I will not use my medical knowledge contrary to the laws of humanity. I make these promises solemnly, freely, and upon my honor.”

See: Hippocratic oath;
See: Declaration of Hawaii; Nightingale Pledge; Prayer of Maimonides
References in periodicals archive ?
24) The 1959 Declaration was inspired by the Declaration of Geneva and expanded on the mandates contained therein.
49) Finally, whereas the Declaration of Geneva used the language "[t]he child must be given," (50) the 1959 Declaration stated that "[t]he child shall enjoy" (51) the rights set forth therein.
54) Finally, neither the Declaration of Geneva nor the 1959 Declaration was a legally binding international agreement protecting the rights of the child.
Declaration of Geneva, supra note 9, at 177; see also Roger J.
The Declaration of Geneva was drafted and approved by Save the Children International Union (S.
The Professional Conduct Committee (PCC), charged with deciding whether he should retain his licence to practise medicine, relied primarily on the Declaration of Geneva, the WMA's Regulations in Time of Armed Conflict (1956, 1983), to identify medical norms of conduct that he violated ('Medical ethics in the time of armed conflict is identical to medical ethics in the time of peace .
He quoted various Medical Declarations, such as The Declaration of Geneva (1948), which states, "I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception, even under threat," and the International Medical Declaration (similar to Lejeune Declaration, 1973), which states, "As medicine remains at the service of life at its end, so it protects life from its beginning".
Immediately following, in 1948, the Declaration of Geneva was developed by the World Medical Association (WMA).
The Declaration of Geneva of the WMA also binds the physician with the words, "The health of my patient will be my first consideration," and the International Code of Medical Ethics (adopted by the WMA in 1949 and further amended) declares that, "A physician shall act in the patient's best interest when providing medical care.

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