decibel

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decibel

 [des´ĭ-bel]
a unit of relative power intensity equal to one tenth of a bel, used for electric or acoustic power measurements; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect and an increase of 10 decibels approximately doubles the loudness of a sound. Abbreviated dB or db.
 Examples of decibel levels in everyday situations. From Frazier et al., 1996.

dec·i·bel (dB, db),

(des'i-bel), Avoid the mispronunciation des'i-b'l.
One tenth of a bel; unit for expressing the relative intensity of sound on a logarithmic scale.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel

/dec·i·bel/ (des´ĭ-bel) a unit used to express the ratio of two powers, usually electric or acoustic powers, equal to one-tenth of a bel; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect.

decibel (dB)

[des′əbəl]
Etymology: L, decimus, one tenth, bel, Alexander G. Bell, Canadian inventor, 1847-1922
a unit of measure of the intensity of sound. A decibel is one tenth of 1 bel (B); an increase of 1 B is perceived as a 10-fold increase in loudness, based on a sound-pressure reference level of 0.0002 dyne/cm2, or 20 micropascals.

dec·i·bel

(dB) (des'i-bĕl)
One tenth of a bel; unit for expressing the relative loudness of sound on a logarithmic scale.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel

A logarithmic unit of comparison between a standard power level and an observed level. The decibel is not a unit of sound intensity but is widely used to compare a noise level with a very low standard reference level near the limit of audibility, and to compare electrical power levels. A tenth of a bel.

Decibel

A unit of measure for expressing the loudness of a sound. Normal speech is typically spoken in the range of about 20-50 decibels.
Mentioned in: Audiometry, Hearing Loss

decibel (dB)

1. Unit used for the measurement of the intensity of a sound. 2. Light intensities are often presented on a logarithmic (rather than linear) scale. This is done, in particular, to abbreviate large numbers. Moreover, it has become common, especially in perimetry, to use decibels rather than log units. A decibel scale is a logarithmic scale where 10 decibels are equal to 1 log unit; 20 decibels, to 2 log units, etc. In perimetry, decibels are used to indicate the attenuation of brightness of the stimulus. Thus, a 20 dB stimulus is equal to one-tenth the brightness of a 10 dB stimulus.

dec·i·bel

(dB) (des'i-bĕl)
One tenth of a bel.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel (des´ibel),

n a logarithmic ratio unit that indicates by what proportion one intensity level differs from another.

decibel

a unit used to express the ratio of two powers, usually electric or acoustic powers, equal to one-tenth of a bel; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect. Abbreviated dB or db. See also bel.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to researchers at Karolinska University in Sweden, there is also a centimetre increase in waistline for every 10 decibel rise in traffic noise levels.
About 120 decibels sound is safe only for seven seconds.
It turns out that around 70 decibels is the sweet spot.
7 decibels, four decibels higher than Chelsea and two higher than the then world record for the 'Loudest Stadium Roar', held by the Denver Broncos.
When you consider that pain from exposure to high sound pressure levels only occurs at around 120 decibels, you can see that prolonged listening at levels lower than this threshold yet high enough to cause damage to hearing is something that is easily tolerated.
Of the test cars, only a Porsche 911 did not to record levels above 85 decibels at 55mph.
Sound waves from high decibel levels stimulate those same sensors all over our bodies.
The legal level is 82 decibels, but in line with other forces we are using 90 decibels as the limit to take account for the effects of any wear and tear," said PC Edwards, who has also come across cars registering levels of 104db, 103db and 96db.
He may prescribe ear drops or 10 DECIBELS: 60 DECIBELS: 80 DECIBELS: at full blast, factory (prolonged 80 decibels 85 DECIBELS: 10 DECIBELS: 150 DECIBELS: off100maway 170 DECIBELS: syringe your ears.
Two other species flying over open water made the loudest sounds yet recorded for any bat, averaging around 137 decibels.
Noise levels in Cairo regularly reach an average of 90 decibels during the day--the equivalent sound level of a diesel truck--and seldom drop below 70 decibels, despite the introduction of a law in 1994 that set the maximum allowable daytime noise level at 52 decibels and 37 decibels at night.
The MP presented his own proposed laws, an amendment to the Fireworks Act 2003, which would reduce the maximum allowed noise level from 120 decibels to 95 decibels.