decibel

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decibel

 [des´ĭ-bel]
a unit of relative power intensity equal to one tenth of a bel, used for electric or acoustic power measurements; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect and an increase of 10 decibels approximately doubles the loudness of a sound. Abbreviated dB or db.
 Examples of decibel levels in everyday situations. From Frazier et al., 1996.

dec·i·bel (dB, db),

(des'i-bel), Avoid the mispronunciation des'i-b'l.
One tenth of a bel; unit for expressing the relative intensity of sound on a logarithmic scale.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel

/dec·i·bel/ (des´ĭ-bel) a unit used to express the ratio of two powers, usually electric or acoustic powers, equal to one-tenth of a bel; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect.

decibel (dB)

[des′əbəl]
Etymology: L, decimus, one tenth, bel, Alexander G. Bell, Canadian inventor, 1847-1922
a unit of measure of the intensity of sound. A decibel is one tenth of 1 bel (B); an increase of 1 B is perceived as a 10-fold increase in loudness, based on a sound-pressure reference level of 0.0002 dyne/cm2, or 20 micropascals.

dec·i·bel

(dB) (des'i-bĕl)
One tenth of a bel; unit for expressing the relative loudness of sound on a logarithmic scale.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel

A logarithmic unit of comparison between a standard power level and an observed level. The decibel is not a unit of sound intensity but is widely used to compare a noise level with a very low standard reference level near the limit of audibility, and to compare electrical power levels. A tenth of a bel.

Decibel

A unit of measure for expressing the loudness of a sound. Normal speech is typically spoken in the range of about 20-50 decibels.
Mentioned in: Audiometry, Hearing Loss

decibel (dB)

1. Unit used for the measurement of the intensity of a sound. 2. Light intensities are often presented on a logarithmic (rather than linear) scale. This is done, in particular, to abbreviate large numbers. Moreover, it has become common, especially in perimetry, to use decibels rather than log units. A decibel scale is a logarithmic scale where 10 decibels are equal to 1 log unit; 20 decibels, to 2 log units, etc. In perimetry, decibels are used to indicate the attenuation of brightness of the stimulus. Thus, a 20 dB stimulus is equal to one-tenth the brightness of a 10 dB stimulus.

dec·i·bel

(dB) (des'i-bĕl)
One tenth of a bel.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel (des´ibel),

n a logarithmic ratio unit that indicates by what proportion one intensity level differs from another.

decibel

a unit used to express the ratio of two powers, usually electric or acoustic powers, equal to one-tenth of a bel; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect. Abbreviated dB or db. See also bel.
References in periodicals archive ?
When they detect no obvious reaction, they ramp the array up to 135 Db -- ten times louder (the decibel scale, like the Richter, is logarithmic).
These whales reach 188 dB on the decibel scale, creating the loudest sounds emitted by any living source.
The recommended practice outlines the target dialogue level at -24 on a -1 to -31 decibel scale -- with -1 being the loudest and -31 being the softest.