radioactive decay

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Related to Decay mode: Nuclear decay

radioactive decay

the disintegration of the nucleus of an unstable nuclide by the spontaneous emission of charged particles, photons, or both.

radioactive decay

The continual loss of energy by radioactive substances. Disintegration of the nucleus by the emission of alpha, beta, or gamma rays eventually results in the complete loss of radioactivity. The time required for some materials to become stable may be minutes and, for others, thousands of years.
See: half-life
See also: decay

radioactive

characterized by radioactivity.

radioactive decay
spontaneous decomposition of the nuclei of the atoms of radioactive substances. Measured as the proportion of the atoms in a radionuclide that decompose per unit of time, usually stated as the half-life of that particular isotope.
radioactive fallout
dissemination of radioactive substances through the atmosphere and deposition on the environment generally; causes radiation injury.
radioactive isotope
radionuclide. A radioactive nuclide, e.g. radioactive iodine or strontium.
radioactive tracer
see radioactive tracer.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, detecting two-neutrino double-beta decay in the laboratory is not an easy feat, since the energies of the emitted particles are comparable to those found in much more common radioactive decay modes from elements such as uranium, which is present in most materials.
Materials scientists, geologists, and specialists in mining, archeology, environmental science, food analysis and medicine will find this database helpful in determining isotropic composition, total and partial thermal radiative cross-sections, Westcott factors, prompt and delayed energies of gamma rays, decay modes, half-lives and branching ratios in prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) projects.
We discovered some new and interesting decay modes of B mesons, which hadn't ever been seen before," Stone told LiveScience.
General topics include basic principles of atomic physics, including nuclear systematics decay modes of radionuclides, radioactive decay and geochronometry, radiogenic isotope geochronometers, including a complete range of methods, the geochemistry of radiogenic isotopes, including igneous rocks, water, and sediment, and the oceans, short-lived radionuclides, and fractionation of stable isotopes.