cat scratch disease

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cat scratch disease

n.
An infectious disease of humans that is caused by a bacterium (Bartonella henselae) transmitted by the scratch or bite of a cat and is characterized by a papular lesion, fever, and swollen lymph glands. Also called cat scratch fever.
A self-limited regional lymphadenitis of children/adolescents, caused by close contact with or being scratched by household pets; 95% are due to cats—especially kittens—5% to dogs Epidemiology ± 22,000/year—US 2,000 hospitalizations; most cases occur in those under age 20, more common in men, often in fall and winter; fleas may be vectors
Agent Bartonella henselae, formerly Rochalimaea henselae
Diagnosis History, indirect fluorescence
Management Gentamycin, ciprofloxacin

cat scratch disease

Cat scratch fever A self-limited regional lymphadenitis of children/adolescents, caused by close contact with or being scratched by household pets; 95% are due to cats–especially kittens, 5% to dogs Epidemiology ± 22,000/yr–US 2,000 hospitalizations; most cases occur in those under age 20, more common in ♂, often in fall and winter; fleas may be vectors Clinical Erythematous papules at the inoculation sites, eg hands and forearms, anorexia, malaise, fever, parotid swelling, maculopapular rashes, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, encephalopathy Diagnosis Hx, indirect fluorescence for antibodies to Rochalimaea henselae Treatment Gentamycin, ciprofloxacin. Cf Bacillary angiomatosis.

cat scratch disease

A febrile disease characterized by lymphadenitis and, in some cases, conjunctivitis, uveitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, or central nervous system infections, transmitted to people by cats, esp. kittens. Fever, malaise, headache, and anorexia accompany the lymphadenopathy. The causative organism is Bartonella henselae (formerly Rochalimaea), which in cats usually produces asymptomatic infection. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings, a history of contact with cats, and positive results from a cat scratch antigen skin test. Antibiotics are not recommended in mild disease, but aminoglycosides, quinolones, or macrolides may be indicated for severe, disseminated disease. Synonym: benign lymphoreticulosis of inoculationbacillary angiomatosis; Bartonella;

Patient care

The patient is assessed for related symptoms and a history of cat contact. Prescribed cat scratch antigen skin testing is explained and administered. The patient is taught how to use hot compresses and handle and dispose of contaminated dressings. He is also advised to report headache, sore throat, stiff neck, and continuing fever (esp. if accompanied by chills or night sweats) because these may be indicators of rare complications. The patient is referred for further immune system evaluation if immunodeficiency is suspected because immunocompromise puts the patient at high risk for a disseminated form of this disease.

Patient discussion about cat scratch disease

Q. Is there any information out there regarding a severe allergy to cat scratches? Is there any information out there regarding a severe allergy to cat scratches? I am not referring to "cat scratch fever" disease, but an allergy where the site of the scratch becomes swollen and red, and the person has hives and trouble breathing. Thanks so much!

A. Greetings Humble Earthling! It sounds like you have two or more things going on. First, cat scratch fever is caused by a parasite and comes on 1 to 2 weeks after the scratch. Allergic reactions are immediate.
Now, if the site of the scratch is swollen and red, that could be due to minor infection and just the process of healing.

More discussions about cat scratch disease