death mask

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death mask

Etymology: AS, death + Fr, masque
an image or cast made from clay, wax, plaster of paris, or other moldable material of the face after death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vespers' death masks, however, are designed to reveal cultural heritage and speculate about the perpetuation of life, both cultural and biological.
The second sub-series, Present', explores the transition between life and death, reflecting the progression of the death mask from a symbolic cultural relic in the first sub-series to a functional biological interface in the third.
Cardiff-based Wild Dream Films' documentary, Death Masks, has received a nomination in the Best Graphics category in the Emmys - the television world's equivalent of the Oscars.
This was achieved by applying the very latest cuttingedge digital modelling and animation technology to the life and death masks of some of the greatest figures in history.
A DEATH mask of the man who cancelled Christmas is the star attraction in an upcoming exhibition.
Oliver Cromwell's death mask will feature in Siege and Storm, which tells the story of Newcastle and the North East during the English Civil Wars of the 17th Century.
Sion Hughes, head of business affairs at Wild Dream Films of Cardiff, said the lifelike images created for their production, Death Masks, were achieved by applying cuttingedge digital modelling and animation technology to actual death masks.
The Death Masks documentary for History Channel US has been nominated for an award in the Best History Programme category, alongside World War Two in Colour and Marr's The Making of Modern Britain.
Demonstrators with banners marched from the nearby town of Llantwit Major and some were wearing black clothes, chemical suits and white death masks.
For previous exhibitions she has cast animal death masks in amber and taught parrots a defunct Amazonian language.
And, with their faces frozen before the aperture, an elusive assemblage of disembodied features uncomfortably reminiscent of death masks, Felten-Massinger alert us as well to the pass age of time that marks our own mortality.
It attaches theory to his twentieth-century oddities and provides some history as well to his overarching theme of "resemblance by contact" - from fossils and archeological remains, to the shroud of Turin and death masks, to Auguste Rodin's casts of body parts and Marcel Duchamp's Female Fig Leaf, 1950-51.