deaf-blind

(redirected from Deafblindness)
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Related to Deafblindness: Helen Keller

deaf-blind

or

deafblind

(dĕf′blĭnd′)
adj.
Being both deaf and blind.

deaf′-blind′ness, deaf′blind′ness n.

deaf-blind

A person who has a severe hearing impairment in addition to a visual defect. It is usually congenital but it may result from ageing or some systemic disease or as part of a syndrome (e.g. Usher's syndrome which accounts for about half of all cases of deaf-blind people; rubella syndrome).
References in periodicals archive ?
These outcomes are very important for persons with congenital deafblindness because limited access to the physical and human environment makes them vulnerable to experiencing negative emotions and tensions (Rodbroe & Souriau, 1999).
researcher, Kentalis Deafblindness Center of Excellence, Royal Dutch Kentalis, Petrus Dondersplein 1, 5271 AA Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands, and Department of Special Needs Education and Youth Care, University of Groningen, Grote Rozenstraat 38, 9712 TJ Groningen, the Netherlands; e-mail: <m.
Safety is the first priority during community travel, and the directions for students with deafblindness needed to be simple to ensure students understood the terminology and the desired behavior before beginning to travel.
Deafblind Scotland are not able to raise a lot of funds from the public because deafblindness isn't well known - few people have deafblindness in their lives.
Deafblindness also affects an individual's ability to function and carry out daily activities.
The report's figures are based on analysis of current levels of deafblindness and projections based on demographic data.
The second is Deafblind Awareness, which will be taught over five evenings and leads to an understanding of the types and causes of deafblindness and the range of communication modes appropriate with deafblind people.
The UK Online Centre is based at the Edgbaston, Birmingham, headquarters of the Sense charity, which cares for people with deafblindness and associated disabilities.
The categories include specific learning disability, mental retardation, speech or language impairment, serious emotional disturbance, deaf or hard of hearing, visual impairment, deafblindness, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, and other health impairment.
Usher syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that is a leading cause of deafblindness and is characterized by vision loss due to RP and bilateral congential hearing loss.
Stockholm University, Department of Education interpretation procure sign language interpretation and interpretation for deaf, hard of hearing and deafened students and staff as well as students and employees with deafblindness at Stockholm University and other universities in the Stockholm region.