deafness

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deafness

 [def´nes]
hearing loss; lack or loss of all or a major part of the sense of hearing. For types, see under hearing loss.
Alexander's deafness congenital deafness due to cochlear aplasia involving chiefly the organ of Corti and adjacent ganglion cells of the basal coil of the cochlea; high-frequency hearing loss results.
central deafness that due to causes in the auditory pathways or in the brain; see hearing loss.
conduction deafness (conductive deafness) conductive hearing loss.
functional deafness functional hearing loss.
hysterical deafness functional hearing loss.
pagetoid deafness that occurring in osteitis deformans of the bones of the skull (paget's disease).
sensorineural deafness
1. that due to a defect in the inner ear or the acoustic nerve. See hearing loss.
word deafness auditory aphasia.

deaf·ness

(def'nes),
General term for inability to hear.

deafness

/deaf·ness/ (-nes) hearing loss; lack or loss, complete or partial, of the sense of hearing.
acoustic trauma deafness  that due to blast injury.
Alexander's deafness  congenital deafness due to cochlear aplasia, chiefly of the organ of Corti and adjacent ganglion cells, with high-frequency hearing loss results.
conduction deafness , conductive deafness conductive hearing loss.
labyrinthine deafness  that due to disease of the labyrinth.
Michel's deafness  congenital deafness due to total lack of development of the inner ear.
Mondini's deafness  congenital deafness due to dysgenesis of the organ of Corti, with partial aplasia of the bony and membranous labyrinth and a resultant flattened cochlea.
nerve deafness , neural deafness that due to a lesion of the auditory nerve on the central neural pathways.
pagetoid deafness  that seen in osteitis deformans of the bones of the skull.
perceptive deafness  sensorineural hearing loss.
transmission deafness  conductive hearing loss.
word deafness  auditory aphasia.

deafness

a condition characterized by a loss of hearing that makes it impossible for an individual to understand speech through hearing alone. In assessing deafness, the ears are examined for drainage, crusts, accumulation of cerumen, or structural abnormality. It is determined whether the hearing loss is conductive or sensory, temporary or permanent, and congenital or acquired in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. The effect of aging is evaluated. A psychosocial assessment is conducted to ascertain whether the individual is well adjusted to hearing loss or reacts to the disability with fear, anxiety, frustration, depression, anger, or hostility. In all cases the degree of loss and the kind of impairment causing it are determined. See also conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss.
observations Many conditions and diseases may result in hearing loss. More than 21 million people in the United States have some degree of hearing loss; of them, more than 50% are above 65 years of age. The person with a slight hearing loss may be initially unaware of the problem. Recognition, diagnosis, and early treatment may help prevent further impairment and prevent frustration, embarrassment, and danger for the person. An older person with a hearing impairment usually has a sensorineural loss. High-frequency sounds are hard to hear, and discernment of such softer speech sounds such as /s/ and /f/ becomes difficult. A severe or sudden hearing loss usually drives the person to seek help. If the loss is sudden, confusion, fear, and even panic are common. The person's speech becomes loud and slurred. There is new danger because the person cannot hear horns, whistles, or sirens and has not developed a way to cope with the impairment safely. The congenitally deaf person needs special speech and language intervention before reaching school age.
interventions The treatment of hearing loss depends on the cause. Merely removing impacted cerumen from the external auditory canal may significantly improve hearing. Hearing aids, amplification of sound, or speech reading may be useful. Speech therapy is useful in teaching a person to speak or helping a person to retain the ability to speak.
nursing considerations Caring for a deaf person who is hospitalized for treatment of another problem requires certain adjustments in communication between nurse and patient. If the patient uses a hearing aid, its placement and operation are checked before the speaker begins to talk; the voice is modulated to a level that is comfortable for the patient, and the speaker stands or sits where the lips are visible to the deaf individual. If the patient uses sign language, an interpreter or another means of communication is sought; when a pad and pencil are used, a frequent practice with the newly deaf, the messages are written clearly in short, simple phrases, and adequate time is allowed for the patient to understand and answer. The bed is located so that the patient can see the door.

deaf·ness

(def'nĕs)
General term for loss of the ability to hear, without designation of the degree or cause of the loss.

deafness

Partial or complete loss of hearing. Deafness may be conductive or sensorineural. Conductive deafness results from disorders of the external ear, eardrum, middle ear and acoustical link to the inner ear; sensorineural (nerve deafness) results form disorders in the inner ear-the cochlea or acoustic nerve.

deaf·ness

(def'nĕs)
General term for inability to hear.

deafness (def´nes),

n a condition characterized by a partial or complete loss of hearing.
deafness, central,
n impaired hearing caused by interference with cerebral auditory pathways or in the auditory centers in the brain (e.g., cerebrovascular accidents and other degenerative brain diseases). Hearing aids are of little benefit.
deafness, conduction
n See deafness, transmission.
deafness, nerve,
n impaired hearing caused by pathologic conditions in the auditory nerve or the hair cells of the organ of Corti in the inner ear (e.g., high-tone deafness, which comes with age; damage to the organ of Corti by noise; or a tumor of an auditory nerve). Hearing aids are usually of little benefit.
deafness, transmission (conduction deafness),
n impaired hearing caused by interference with passage of sound waves through the external ear (e.g., interference caused by wax) or middle ear (e.g., interference caused by otitis media, aerotitis media, or otosclerosis). May be characterized by greater interference with hearing of low tones. Hearing aids that amplify may be helpful.

deafness

lack or loss, complete or partial, of the sense of hearing.

conductive deafness
sound vibrations are interrupted in the outer or middle ear and do not reach the inner ear and its nerve endings.
congenital deafness
infrequent in dogs and cats, not recorded in other species. In most cases is due to cochlear duct degeneration. See also inherited deafness (below).
cortical deafness
that due to disease of the cortical centers of the cerebrum.
inherited deafness
occurs in some blue-eyed white cats and in some dog breeds; particularly common in the Dalmatian. In some cases it is associated with coat coloration, e.g. white Bull terriers, merle collies and Old English sheepdogs.
nerve deafness
due to degeneration of the acoustic sensory organ. Most common in dogs at an early age and associated with incomplete pigmentation of the haircoat and the uvea, in animals with a white or merle coat color. Occurs also in mink, cats and mice.
sensorineural deafness
due to damage of the inner ear nerve endings, the cochlear portion of the eighth cranial nerve, the vestibulocochlear nerve, or the cortical hearing center. See also nerve deafness (above).
toxic deafness
overdosing with aminoglycoside antibiotics causes deafness.
transmission deafness
conductive hearing loss.

Patient discussion about deafness

Q. what is this immediate hearing loss???? I woke up yesterday and didnt hear anything, only very high tones in my left ear. I also feel nausious and dizzy. please tell me someone has experienced it and it goes away in a few days!!! I'm very scared to loose my hearing forever, it's been 24 hours that I'm almost deaf. thank you

A. Acute hearing loss can be caused due to an infection of the middle ear or internal ear that can cause dizziness nausea fever and vomiting as well. You should see a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment.

More discussions about deafness
References in periodicals archive ?
As Catherine Kudlick noted in a recent review of the field of disability history (of which deaf history is sometimes understood as a subgenre and sometimes as a competing field), exploration of race and gender has been problematically sacrificed by scholars of deaf history in order that its coherency be maintained.
Mr Hay, who lives in Wolverhampton, has researched deaf history and the development of British Sign Language and has also brought together several objects to illustrate the development of deaf education.
They should because the two actual problems of our deaf children and youth at schools around the country are: (1) communication barriers to information and knowledge on any subject, including deaf history, and (2) the lack of deaf role models as librarians or other related professionals in the library.
Gannon (Curator of the History Through Deaf Eyes exhibition), and Jean Lindquist Borgey (Director of the History Through Deaf Eyes Project, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC), "Through Deaf Eyes: A Photographic History Of An American Community" is the companion volume to an acclaimed PBS television documentary based on a landmark photographic exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution in 2001 celebrating almost 200 years of United States Deaf History.
When the centre opens it will include a specially built theatre and library and provide access to deaf history, art, photography and community groups for the deaf.
The Deaf History Society and Wales Deaf Broadcasting Council have been trying to locate the film in the BBC archives, without success.
Scholars in Deaf history offer one approach to this issue by examining the community through a cultural lens rather than a medical or pathological interpretation.
At almost all of the colleges and universities that offer allied health and counseling programs, cross-curriculum electives generally include Deaf studies where students learn about Deaf theater, Deaf poetry, Deaf history, American Sign Language, and other topics related to Deaf culture.
A fair chance in the race of life; the role of Gallaudet University in deaf history.
Plann writes about a part of deaf history that has until recently remained hidden from the deaf in Spain and from the hearing community in the United States and Europe.

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