erotomania

(redirected from De Clerambault's syndrome)
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Related to De Clerambault's syndrome: erotomanic delusion

erotomania

 [ĕ-rot″o-ma´ne-ah]
1. a disorder in which the subject believes that a person, usually older and of higher social status, is deeply in love with him or her; failure of the object of the delusion to respond to the subject's advances are rationalized, and pursuit and harassment of the object of the delusion may occur.
2. occasionally, hypersexuality.

er·o·to·ma·ni·a

(er'ō-tō-mā'nē-ă),
1. Excessive or morbid inclination to erotic thoughts and behavior.
2. The delusional belief that one is involved in a relationship with another, generally of unattainable status.
[G. erōs, love, + mania, frenzy]

erotomania

/ero·to·ma·nia/ (-ma´ne-ah)
1. a type of delusional disorder in which the subject harbors a delusion that a particular person is deeply in love with them; lack of response is rationalized, and pursuit and harassment may occur.
2. occasionally, hypersexuality.erotoman´ic

erotomania

(ĭ-rō′tə-mā′nē-ə, ĭ-rŏt′ə-)
n.
1. Excessive sexual desire.
2. Psychiatry A delusional, romantic preoccupation with another person, often a public figure.

e·ro′to·ma′ni·ac′ (-mā′nē-ăk′) n.
e·ro′to·ma·ni′a·cal (-mə-nī′ə-kəl) adj.
(1) A condition affecting a young woman who believes that an older man of higher socioeconomic status is in love with her. Cf Bovarism
(2) Erotomanic delusion, hypersexuality; A morbid exaggeration of, or preoccupation with sexuoerotic imagery and activity. See Don Juan syndrome, Nymphomania

erotomania

Sexology Hypersexuality A morbid exaggeration of, or preoccupation with sexuoerotic imagery and activity. See Cherambault-Kandinsky syndrome, Don Juan syndrome, Nymphomania.

er·o·to·ma·ni·a

(ĕ-rot'ō-mā'nē-ă)
1. Excessive or morbid inclination to erotic thoughts and behavior.
2. The delusional belief that one is involved in a relationship with another, generally of higher socioeconomic status.
[G. erōs, love, + mania, frenzy]
References in periodicals archive ?
He brought de Clerambault's syndrome to public attention three years ago through the book, Hidden Love, but the Parisian psychiatrist de Clerambault was first to identify it 90 years ago.
Consultant forensic psychologist Gerard Bailes says that in such cases there is often evidence of pathological jealousy known as Othello syndrome or De Clerambault's syndrome, where a person can become fixated on the object of their love and desire, stalking them and checking up on their every movement.
His particular insanity, Joe later finds, is known as de Clerambault's syndrome, which features a belief that the object of obsession has initiated a love affair and is cruelly toying with the subject by sending secret signals of encouragement while overtly denying the shared passion.
Despite Joe the narrator's awareness of the seductions and distortions of narrative, Joe the character, by the middle of the novel, is narrativizing everything; every event in his world is assimilated to the story of Jed Parry, the sufferer of de Clerambault's syndrome.
One of the novel's many narrative twists is that Joe, as paranoid as he seems, turns out to be perfectly correct about Parry's violent aims, and the first appendix provides a psychiatric case history of Jed Parry, confirming Joe's amateur but empiricist diagnosis of de Clerambault's syndrome.
Such a Lacanian analysis of Joe's pathology, a pathology in which the facts will always confirm the symbolic fantasy structure, suggests de Clerambault's syndrome itself, the illness with which Jed is diagnosed.