cell division

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division

 [dĭ-vizh´un]
the act of separating into parts.
cell division fission of a cell, the process by which cells reproduce.

cell division

n.
The process by which a cell divides to form two daughter cells. Upon completion of the process, each daughter cell contains the same genetic material as the original cell and roughly half of its cytoplasm.

cell division

the continuous process by which a cell alternates between a long interphase period and mitosis. Mitosis involves four stages: prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. Cell division does not occur in discrete steps: each phase is part of a continuous process that may require hours for its completion. During the interphase period new deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein molecules are synthesized before the start of the next prophase. Compare meiosis. See also mitosis.

cell division

the division of a cell into two new cells during growth or reproduction. The new cells are called daughter cells. In PROKARYOTES, two identical cells are produced by BINARY FISSION. In EUKARYOTES, cell division is more complicated because the genetic material is located on CHROMOSOMES inside the nucleus, being composed of two distinct processes that usually occur together; (a) nuclear division (MITOSIS producing two identical nuclei, or MEIOSIS producing four nuclei with a halving of the genetic complement) and (b) cytoplasmic division (CYTOKINESIS).

cell division

the process by which cells reproduce; fission of a cell.