Daubert's test

Daubert's test

(dō-băr′) [F. Daubert v. Merrel Down Pharmaceuticals]
A set of legal standards governing the admissibility of scientific evidence or expert testimony in a court of law. According to Daubert, the evidence must be empirically tested, published, and peer reviewed, have known rates of error, and be explainable with clarity and simplicity to the court.
References in periodicals archive ?
1995) (finding that expert testimony satisfied Daubert's test of relevance and reliability); Cavallo v.