Daubert's test

Daubert's test

(dō-băr′) [F. Daubert v. Merrel Down Pharmaceuticals]
A set of legal standards governing the admissibility of scientific evidence or expert testimony in a court of law. According to Daubert, the evidence must be empirically tested, published, and peer reviewed, have known rates of error, and be explainable with clarity and simplicity to the court.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the most frequently cited opinion on this issue is the Tenth Circuit's in Compton, in which the court held that the trial court erred in applying Daubert's test for admissibility of scientific evidence to the proffered opinion testimony of an engineer.
1995) (finding that expert testimony satisfied Daubert's test of relevance and reliability); Cavallo v.
Under Daubert, it is a separate question whether or not an economist making the same arguments would pass Daubert's tests and be allowed to testify.