abstraction

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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
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