darwinism

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darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

darwinism

/dar·win·ism/ (dahr´win-izm) the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.

darwinism

The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.

darwinism

the theory of evolution according to which higher organisms have been developed from lower ones through the influence of natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frequently, especially when the group, because of its presumed laziness, selfishness, inherent incompetence, or other related reasons, is viewed as unworthy of aid, these zerosum arguments are couched in Malthusian or social Darwinistic language.
In particular, Fornari refers to Ree's emphasis on English scientific method, and particularly Darwinian evolutionism, against the metaphysical and teleological explanations prevalent in German academia, his Darwinistic account of the value of altruism in terms of the survival of the community, and his deflationary account of retributive justice in terms of the forgetting of punishment's original, purely deterrent function.
But Rosen's view of international politics goes beyond renascent Reagan-era hawkishness and embraces a social Darwinistic framework for understanding hegemonic America's challenges.
These studies review theoretical understandings as diverse as Darwinistic evolutionary theories applied to corporate-wide reorganizations (White, Marin, Brazeal and Friedman, 1997) and Kleiner's thesis that change agents from the fourth through eighth century were no different than the corporate change agents of today (Kleiner, 1996).
At the same time, the Darwinistic assertion of settler moral and cultural superiority requires Maori to assimilate into settler culture or become extinct.
We really shouldn't be creating a Darwinistic environment for public education, where it's survival of the fittest, or those with the most resources.
It also coincided precisely with the chronological framework of the new, hard-shelled, and one might say social Darwinistic nationalism.
These observers were, of course, aware of the articles in Pravda (Truth), the major official Soviet publication, about the Social Darwinistic bent of Western life, with frantic competition for good jobs and insecurity for quite a few Westerners.