darwinism

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darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

darwinism

/dar·win·ism/ (dahr´win-izm) the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.

darwinism

The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.

darwinism

the theory of evolution according to which higher organisms have been developed from lower ones through the influence of natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
By fathering Ego and for having a blissful marriage for those five wonderful years that--courtesy of a wonderful lady--would have gone on to six, seven, and so on had the secrets of his past gay life not been known, to Darwin, he is an accomplished innate Darwinist in sexuality whom the environment has pushed to become gay.
Some Darwinists try to explain acts of altruism (a father saving his drowning son) by resorting to the genetic instinct to preserve one's own kind.
The idea that science and religion clash is a deception on the part of materialists and Darwinists.
August is willing to risk his life for a man who propagates the social Darwinist idea that "the bloodstream of every American is hopelessly polluted with Negro and/or Oriental blood" (56).
The second critical error of Social Darwinist thinking was subtly inscribing a human value into nature.
In Germany in 1904, Social Darwinists formed the Monastic League, a
Social Darwinists drew on the idea of struggle and survival as natural mechanisms for improving the "stock"--i.
If mankind did not evolve according to Darwinist logic, but began instead with Adam and Eve, it seems unlikely that societies evolve according to the survival-of-the-fittest logic of social Darwinism.
Take the oft-credited role of Social Darwinist thinking in the Policy's origins.
Symbols such as "savage" and "sub-human" used to label indigenous populations were abstractions that incorporated a Social Darwinist understanding of the alleged similarity between non-white races and "mere animals" in evolutionary terms.
Furthermore, a truly "Social" Gospel suggested that work would have to be carried on in a civic or community framework which was difficult given the strength of laissez faire and Social Darwinist notions of individualism in American Protestantism.
More than one of the studies published in the last five years," he remarks, "will look as quaint, in a generation or two, as the Social Darwinist beatitudes of the late nineteenth century or the Popular Front verities of the thirties do now" (82).