darwinism

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darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

darwinism

/dar·win·ism/ (dahr´win-izm) the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.

darwinism

The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.

darwinism

the theory of evolution according to which higher organisms have been developed from lower ones through the influence of natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the one hand Maoriland writers mythologize Maori as the noble cousins of Celtic legend and on the other draw on social Darwinist theories to categorise Maori as a dying race.
In Germany in 1904, Social Darwinists formed the Monastic League, a
This allows a transitional evolutionist (5) to claim the existence of evidence of the perfectibility of the human species, a religious man to believe that his striving to become more like God may yield tangible results on Earth as well as in Heaven, and a Brazilian Social Darwinist to hope that his own nation might aspire to "evolve" industrially, scientifically, culturally, and racially and to reach the heights already attained by European civilization.
Frost came to think that social Darwinists had misrepresented theories of creative evolution as much as "literal-minded fundamentalists who condemned" Darwin's "theory as a denial of Genesis and all revealed religion" (38).
If, as Wade appears to believe, that character is due to what amounts to Social Darwinist dynamics in the Middle Ages, that surely has implications for the legitimacy of eugenic arguments today.
Ernst Haeckel, the most famous German Darwinist of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, believed that Darwinism was the central component of a new worldview, (the culture of death), which was locked in combat with the traditional dual spiritual-material Judeo-Christian worldview (the culture of life).
In the same vein, this socially Darwinist and staunchly nationalist Young Turkish mentality allowed them in 1915 to get rid of the over half-century-old Armenian question of establishing an independent state in the eastern provinces of Anatolia once and for all.
The work depicts New York City as "the Darwinist capital of the capitalist word" and U.
Caiazza highlights the fundamental incoherency of the Darwinist project, since it is impossible to identify precisely the "unit of selection": is it the gene, the phenotype of the individual organism, or the whole species?
Shortly after the arrest of the social Darwinist Dr.
Social Darwinist perspectives were also expressed by Thomas Malthus in his 1798 "Essay on the Principle of Population" and in its many subsequent editions.