darwinism

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Related to Darwinian process: Darwinian Theory

darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

darwinism

/dar·win·ism/ (dahr´win-izm) the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.

darwinism

The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.

darwinism

the theory of evolution according to which higher organisms have been developed from lower ones through the influence of natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dennett was among the first to posit a "learning algorithm" in the human mind, to interpret learning as a Darwinian process, and to consider the human mind as analogous to software.
I'm the CEO of a very small biotech company," he says, "and I have never seen a more Darwinian process than trying to bring a biotech product forward.
So it appears that the Darwinian process has begun.
The current market shakedown is painful and few enjoy this Darwinian process, but ultimately it will be good for the industry, leading to stronger companies, more innovation and improved services," said Craig Clausen, NPRG Executive Vice President.
He accepts many tenets of the Darwinian evolution theory, including common descent, but his main idea is that although the Darwinian process may be real it has certain limitations, and those limitations can be overcome, in his opinion, only by the interference of an undefined designer (who, on closer inspection, turns out to be the God of the Bible).