evolutionary medicine

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A new discipline that tries to bridge the gaps between medical anthropology, paleoanthropology, and modern medicine, using as its tools the study of genetic relationships between hunter-gatherers and various Stone Age surrogates—e.g., !Kung San of Botswana

evolutionary medicine

A paradigm for medical education and study based on the recognition that a failure to take due account of evolution when viewing human physiology, psychology, pathology and anatomy will result in a truncated, less valid and less fruitful understanding. It should, for instance, be recognized that the biological norm for infants and children is to be exposed to many infections-a condition that may be necessary for the ‘normal’ development of the immune system; and that since throughout almost the whole of human evolution life expectancy has been no more than about 30 years, systems have evolved which are largely indifferent to conditions that do not arise until well after that age. There is good reason to believe that affluence may have much more widespread malign effects than merely obesity and that these may include greatly increased susceptibility to various cancers.
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Darwinian medicine and the 'hygiene' or 'old friends' hypothesis.
Williams's Why We Get Sick (1996)--in Darwinian medicine, which attempts to incorporate evolutionary principles in the theory and practice of contemporary medicine.
A basic prediction of evolutionary or Darwinian medicine is that the human foot is likely to be well adapted to running long distances barefoot.
Evolutionary theory, which gave rise to a new discipline named Darwinian medicine, has had a major impact on modern medical research and practice.
Darwinian medicine comprises five major categories, namely: (i) evolved host defences; (ii) evolution of virulence; (iii) genetic conflicts with other organisms; (iv) adaptation to novel environments; and (v) trade-offs and constraints in biological systems.
A major area of enquiry in Darwinian medicine stems from the concept that the human body adapted to a Palaeolithic environment and is maladapted to modern lifestyles.
The new discipline of Darwinian medicine has made a significant impression on research in medical and related sciences.
Including principles of Darwinian medicine in curricula does not necessitate a separate course; (27) the subject may be included in preclinical and clinical years or as a prerequisite to entering medical school.
They are correct to point out that Darwinian Medicine is historical in nature, but it would be erroneous to label it as a science, since it fails to meet the two previously mentioned criteria and is therefore not testable.