dandelion

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dandelion

/dan·de·li·on/ (dan´dĕ-li″on) a weedy herb, Taraxacum officinale, having deeply notched leaves and brilliant yellow flowers; used for dyspepsia, loss of appetite, urinary tract infections, and liver and gallbladder complaints.

dandelion

A perennial herb containing inulin, bitter principles and sesquiterpenes; the roots are rich in vitamins A and C. Chinese and Western herbalists use two different species for different indications.
 
Chinese herbal medicine
The entire plant has been used as an antidote, an anti-inflammatory, to dissolve blood clots, reduce swelling and promote internal secretions; dandelions have also been used for breast disease and poor lactation, colitis, food poisoning, hepatitis and other liver diseases, gallstones, kidney stones, ocular pain and swelling, snakebites, tuberculosis and urinary burning.

Flower essence therapy
An essence which is believed to provide dynamic energy and promote inner peace.
 
Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, dandelion root is a diuretic, laxative and tonic, and has been used for poor digestion, gallbladder disease, hepatitis and other liver diseases, congestive heart failure, hypertension, menstrual pain, premenstrual syndrome and arthritic pain.

dandelion,

n Latin names:
Taraxacum officinale, Taraxacum laevigatum; parts used: buds, leaves, roots; uses: laxative, antihypertensive, diuretic, (under research: antitumor, immunogenic, colon disease, urolithiasis); precautions: pregnancy, lactation, those allergic to chamomile or yarrow root, patients with diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, stomach disorders, bile duct blockage, intestinal blockage, latex allergy; can cause nausea, cholelithiasis, gallbladder infection, contact dermatitis. Also called
blowball, cankerwort, lion's tooth, priest's crown, puffball, swine snout, white endive, and
wild endive.

dandelion

References in periodicals archive ?
A dandelion is actually not one flower but many; each yellow petal strip is actually an individual flower.
One example of this commitment is Continental's research focused on replacing rubber trees with dandelion roots as a rubber source for tire production.
And I also brought you an acorn, some purple clover, and yellow dandelions.
Initial benchtop trials demonstrated that rubber can be extracted from Ohio-grown Buckeye Gold dandelions in the form of solid rubber or in the form of latex.
And that's a shame - because when the Baggies visited the Welsh capital in 1930, there were, indeed, dandelions growing in all four corners of the playing area.
The dandelions emit a glow throughout the story but there is no significant colour shift when Benjamin finds his inner strength.
Has a little floral character, and the dandelions might add some spice, I think I pick some of that flavor," said Tess Szamatulski.
The inspiration for this commentary, if indeed you can be inspired by weeds, has been all the country lanes and roadsides currently flanked with masses of dandelions.
Known to the majority of North Americans as weeds, dandelions are welcomed by enlightened culinary artists in some parts of the world as one of the most tasty and nourishing of foods.
Because dandelion latex transforms from a liquid to a solid on contact with the air (known as polymerisation), turpentine and naphtha are usually required to chemically extract the latex from the shredded remains of Russian dandelions.
IN an attempt to familiarise myself a little better with this week's in-season produce, I went out into the uncultivated dumping ground at the bottom of my garden to find every gardener's worst nightmare - dandelions.