dandelion

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dandelion

/dan·de·li·on/ (dan´dĕ-li″on) a weedy herb, Taraxacum officinale, having deeply notched leaves and brilliant yellow flowers; used for dyspepsia, loss of appetite, urinary tract infections, and liver and gallbladder complaints.

dandelion

A perennial herb containing inulin, bitter principles and sesquiterpenes; the roots are rich in vitamins A and C. Chinese and Western herbalists use two different species for different indications.
 
Chinese herbal medicine
The entire plant has been used as an antidote, an anti-inflammatory, to dissolve blood clots, reduce swelling and promote internal secretions; dandelions have also been used for breast disease and poor lactation, colitis, food poisoning, hepatitis and other liver diseases, gallstones, kidney stones, ocular pain and swelling, snakebites, tuberculosis and urinary burning.

Flower essence therapy
An essence which is believed to provide dynamic energy and promote inner peace.
 
Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, dandelion root is a diuretic, laxative and tonic, and has been used for poor digestion, gallbladder disease, hepatitis and other liver diseases, congestive heart failure, hypertension, menstrual pain, premenstrual syndrome and arthritic pain.

dandelion,

n Latin names:
Taraxacum officinale, Taraxacum laevigatum; parts used: buds, leaves, roots; uses: laxative, antihypertensive, diuretic, (under research: antitumor, immunogenic, colon disease, urolithiasis); precautions: pregnancy, lactation, those allergic to chamomile or yarrow root, patients with diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, stomach disorders, bile duct blockage, intestinal blockage, latex allergy; can cause nausea, cholelithiasis, gallbladder infection, contact dermatitis. Also called
blowball, cankerwort, lion's tooth, priest's crown, puffball, swine snout, white endive, and
wild endive.

dandelion

References in periodicals archive ?
DREAMS: Sonny Paylor, above Picture by NAOMI CORRIGAN; THAT'S HOW IT'S DONE: Olivia Hinton, right, helps to launch this year's campaign by making a wish Picture by DOUG MOODY; WINNERS OF NOTE: East Cleveland Bells jazz band; TAKE A DEEP BREATH: Jessica McDowell, Daniel Johnson and Poppy Joy from Guisborough Day Nursery blow dandelion clocks Picture by DOUG MOODY
uk dandelion clocks in May, from a Strictly dance off in February to happy Halloween pumpkins in October.
Sitting on a bench amid the evergreens, dandelion clocks and long grass, I heard the organ and then singing from within, Thine is the Glory.
HISTORIAN and farmer John Lewis-Stempel's family have lived in Herefordshire for 700 years and a sense of history pervades this chronicle of wrens and robins, campion and dandelion clocks, moles and badgers, which charts a year in the life of his meadow, simply told month by month.
Once we had squelching, cow-patted fields of spry flies and dandelion clocks, of teeming hedgerows and ground veined by tree-roots, where spiders span while butterflies dreamed on the high-seeded grass and the gorse blazed and the blackberries grew plump for the picking fingers of mothers and children - and those fields rolled to the valleys and rivers, passing the clusters of reeds around slow, deep ponds, where the frogs spawned and the sticklebacks swam and the voles hid in whiskered holes near the splashing wellies, under the swoops of dark birds.
Dandelion clocks, webbed with more intricate patterns than any digital watch, nodded over buttercups, made by the God of romance to shine under a sweetheart's chin.
It was an appropriate name because Snow was a Samoyed, one of those fuzzy white dogs who look like Dandelion clocks with legs.