dalton

(redirected from Dalton (origin))
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dalton

 (D) (Da) [dawl´ton]
an arbitrary unit of mass, being ¹⁄₁₂ the mass of the nuclide of carbon-12, equivalent to 1.657 × 10−24 g. Called also atomic mass unit.

Dal·ton

(dawl'tŏn),
John, English chemist, mathematician, and natural philosopher, 1766-1844. See: Dalton law, Dalton-Henry law, daltonian, daltonism.

dal·ton (Da),

(dawl'tŏn),
Term used to indicate a unit of mass equal to 1/12 the mass of a carbon-12 atom, 1.0000 in the atomic mass scale; numerically, but not dimensionally, equal to molecular or particle weight (atomic mass units).
[John Dalton]

dalton

/dal·ton/ (D) (Da) (dawl´ton) an arbitrary unit of mass, being 1/12 the mass of the nuclide of carbon-12, equivalent to 1.657 × 10−24 g.

dalton

Etymology: John Dalton, English chemist and mathematician, 1766-1844
1 an unofficial unit of atomic mass, based on 1/16 of the gram mass of oxygen, now based on 1/12 the mass of carbon-12.
2 (in biochemistry) unit (kilodaltons) that expresses the molecular weight (mass) of proteins and nucleic acids. See also atomic mass.

Dalton

A unit of mass regarded as identical to u (unified atomic mass unit), which is not accepted as standard nomenclature by the IUPAC or IUPAP, equal in mass to 1/12 the mass of a 12C atom. Mass is typically expressed by biologists as kilodaltons (kDa), a unit that  sometimes appears as the label on the x-axis of a mass spectrum.

dal·ton

(Da, D) (dawl'tŏn)
Term unofficially used to indicate a unit of mass equal to 1/12 the mass of a carbon-12 atom, 1.0000 in the atomic mass scale; numerically, but not dimensionally, equal to molecular or particle weight (atomic mass units).
[John Dalton]

dalton

a unit of mass: 1 dalton is equal to 1 atomic mass unit. Molecular weight is often expressed in daltons. The unit is named after John Dalton, who developed the atomic theory of matter.

dalton

an arbitrary unit of mass, being one-twelfth the mass of the nuclide of carbon-12, equivalent to 1.657 × 10−24 g. Called also atomic mass unit.